Center files suit to block additional work requirements for SNAP recipients

SNAP LogoOn January 27, the Center filed suit against the New Mexico Human Services Department regarding the state’s imposition of additional work requirements for 17,500 struggling SNAP recipients.

The New Mexico Human Services Department recently implemented new SNAP eligibility requirements for childless adults ages 18 to 50. Effective on January 1, 2016, the new requirements limit individuals to just three months of SNAP assistance if they cannot find a job that offers 20 hours of work a week or a qualifying job training program, regardless of how hard they are looking for work or if applicable work training is even available. Read more about the importance of SNAP for New Mexico communities here. (link to Defeating Hunger project page).

The Center on Law and Poverty filed suit against the Department to oppose these requirements. Our complaint demonstrates how the state’s administration of the eligibility requirements and the harsh new time limit violate federal law. We are asking the federal court to enjoin the Human Services Department from proceeding with these requirements because they conflict with federal law, adults haven’t received proper notice about them, and workers haven’t been properly trained on the requirements.

You can read more about our lawsuit in the Albuquerque Journal and the Santa Fe New Mexican.

National Commission releases report on hunger to Congress

hunger commission logo On Monday, January 4th, the bi-partisan Commission on Hunger issued its final report on the state of hunger in America. Created by Congress in 2014 to investigate and recommend strategies to reduce hunger, the Commission traveled around the nation, meeting with policymakers, advocacy organization, and communities.

The New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty was invited by the Commission to provide testimony about food insecurity in New Mexico because of our expertise in food assistance programs. The information we provided helped Congresswoman Lujan-Grisham prepare an exchange on New Mexico’s attempt to impose SNAP work requirements in a November 2015 hearing. See the video here:
https://www.facebook.com/RepLujanGrisham/videos/744880462322142/

Our funding partner MAZON: A Jewish Response to Hunger, a national voice in anti-hunger advocacy, also testified to the Commission. MAZON’s recommendations were adopted by the Commission and address strategies for ending hunger for veterans, active military, and their families.

We agree with the Commission’s findings that “Hunger is a significant problem that has serious, health, education and workforce consequences for our nation.” We hope that Congress will use these recommendations to advance anti-hunger efforts in America, so that every family will be able to put food on their table.

You can read the full report here: https://hungercommission.rti.org/

Human Services Department withdraws new hurdles to food assistance – for now…

Last week, the Human Services Department withdrew proposed changes to work requirements for food assistance, conceding that the Department could not legally implement the new rules.

This about-face was a direct result of our lawsuit challenging the illegal process that the state used to implement the new requirements. The New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty and the Southwest Organizing Project, along with New Mexicans in need of food assistance, filed this suit on October 31st. Our case outlined how the Department failed to follow proper procedure when it did not make the full proposal available for public review. Additionally, the information that was released contained inaccurate descriptions of the rule changes and contradictory statements about how a person can fulfill the requirements, making it impossible for New Mexicans to comply.

A Santa Fe District Court judge found merit with the concerns we voiced and issued a temporary restraining order, meaning that the proposed changes would not go into effect until a full hearing could be held. Just hours before that hearing, Department attorneys advised the Center and SWOP that the state was withdrawing the proposal. On the same day, we learned that Human Services Department Secretary Sidonie Squier had resigned.

We believe the Human Services Department intends to reissue the new regulations, which include imposing harsh penalties on those who cannot meet the requirements: adults who do not understand and follow the rules could lose access to food assistance for the next 3 years, and other families could lose benefits for up to one year, devastating punishments for those struggling to eke out a living. We will continue to watch for these policy changes in order to defend this vital safety net.