Trump cuts to food assistance violate sovereignty of Native American Nations

By Christy Chapman, Native American Budget and Policy Institute and Tim Davis, New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty

No one should go without access to food in the United States. However, in the middle of a global pandemic when thousands of people are losing their jobs everyday, the Trump administration continues to pursue cuts to food assistance for more than 27,255 New Mexicans and 755,000 low-income adults nationwide by limiting unemployed adults to just three months of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) food assistance in a three year period.  

There are 23 sovereign nations in the territorial boundaries of New Mexico whose communities will be harmed by this rule. Yet, the federal government failed to consult these sovereign nations, or any others, on the proposed rule that would disproportionately impact Native communities and disrespects the sovereignty of Native governments. 

The Native American Budget and Policy Institute and New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty argue in an amicus brief that as a result the rule is illegal and should be blocked. 

Federal law has long limited SNAP for unemployed adults without children. However, states have flexibility to request waivers for areas with high unemployment and, if unemployment was high state-wide, the whole state could be waived from the time limit. The new rule would limit this flexibility and make it more difficult to obtain waivers for areas of high unemployment including sovereign Native American nations.  

The rule would disproportionately impact several Native American communities, where historically, the unemployment rate can be greater than 50%. In small and rural communities, the only job opportunities may be in the education, health, or government sector. 

The Trump administration ignored written comments against the rule documenting the significant harm it would cause American Indian/Alaskan Native communities. This violates the trust responsibility between the federal government and Native American Nations created by treaties when these Nations ceded large portions of their aboriginal lands to the United States in return for the right to self-government with reserved lands. 

The colonial land seizures restricted access to food, income and agriculture caused widespread food insecurity that persists today. Historic and ongoing systemic inequalities cause many Native American communities to be without the infrastructure and economic development opportunities for adequate employment for all its members. 

A federal court has temporarily stopped the rule and could permanently block it. Congress should also stop the rule and has already suspended its implementation during the public health emergency. 

Pueblos, Tribes, and Nations are in the best position to determine public policy within their territorial boundaries and for their members. In this time of racial reckoning and as the COVID-19 crisis exposes long standing systemic inequalities in New Mexico, the federal government must fulfill its trust responsibility and fully recognize the sovereignty of Native American nations. Under no circumstances should the federal government take food assistance away from people who can’t find work.

ACTION ALERT: Tell the Trump administration not to cut SNAP

We have a shared commitment in our country that no one should ever go hungry, but a new rule proposed by the Trump administration would cause approximately 12,261 New Mexicans to lose food assistance. The rule is so draconian, it  would drop thousands of children from  free and reduced school lunch across the state. 

We need your help to let the Trump administration know that you oppose this attack on New Mexico’s families! Submit your public comment by Monday, September 23.

The rule cuts food assistance by eliminating state ability to increase the gross income test for SNAP. Currently, states have the flexibility to set this test between 130% and 200% of the federal poverty level. New Mexico currently sets the gross income limit at 165% of the federal poverty level. 

In New Mexico over 6,639 single parents, including 2,961 single parents in school and 5,607 children are among those who would lose food benefits. Children who receive SNAP food assistance are categorically eligible for free and reduced lunch and are automatically enrolled. Children cut off of SNAP would lose this enrollment option.. 

Cuts to federal food assistance also hurt our local economy. Over $30 million in economic activity will be lost if New Mexicans lose federal food benefits under this rule. 

The proposal would also end streamlined enrollment options that reduce paperwork for families who are already receiving services funded by New Mexico’s Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Program. Under the proposal, these families would no longer be exempt from the burdensome requirement to document assets.. 

New Mexicans have fought back against similar policies proposed by the Martinez administration, and made it clear that we should fight hunger not hungry people. 

Deadline to submit your public comments: September 23, 2019. 

Submit your comments here: https://www.regulations.gov/document?D=FNS-2018-0037-0001 

What to include in your comment: 

Use the outline below to draft a comment that reflects your opposition to the rule. It does not have to be long or detailed. However, please write some original text to maximize the impact. 

1. Say you oppose the proposal: 

  • I strongly oppose the proposed rule that will take food assistance away from families. 

2. Explain the impact of the proposal on your community: 

  • If the Trump Administration implements the rule, approximately 12,261 New Mexicans will lose food assistance that includes 5,607 children. 
  • One in five New Mexicans participate in the SNAP program. 
  • New Mexico has the highest rate of food insecurity in the nation. According to 2019 USDA Economic Research Service data, 16.8% of New Mexico’s households are food insecure. 
  • The rule jeopardizes access to free and reduced lunch, because kids who are eligible for SNAP are also eligible for automatic enrollment free and reduced school lunch. 
  • The rule will cause a loss of approximately $30 million in economic activity, and SNAP dollars are spent in the local economy. 

3. Explain why the policy is wrong: 

  • The proposal runs contrary to the purpose of SNAP, which is to “safeguard the health and well-being of the Nation’s population by raising levels of nutrition among low-income households.” 
  • Losing SNAP can mean an increase in healthcare costs. A study published by the American Medical Association found that on average SNAP participation lowers an individual’s health care expenditures by approximately $1,447.00 per year. 
  • Families who work for low wages, or who cannot find enough work hours, will be expected to go hungry.

ACTION ALERT- Stop Trump’s attack on food assistance!

Federal food assistance was created to increase nutrition levels and eliminate hunger. However, a new rule proposed by the Trump administration threatens food assistance for more than 27,000 New Mexicans and 755,000 low income adults nationwide.

Federal law already requires that states limit SNAP eligibility to just three months out of every three years for unemployed and underemployed adults without dependent children unless they can document 20 hours of work a week.

Now the Trump administration has proposed to make the time limits even harsher with a rule that would prevent states from waiving these draconian time limits in areas with too few jobs.

Please tell the Trump administration to abandon this unfair rule!

New Mexico has implemented a statewide waiver of the time limits for decades because our unemployment levels have been more than 20 percent above the national average.

New Mexico has some of the highest rates of food insecurity in the United States, and SNAP has been a critical tool in addressing hunger. But counties like Catron, Cibola, McKinley, Mora, Sierra, Taos, and Torrance—with unemployment rates over seven percent—would likely no longer qualify for a waiver. The same would be true for most Native American communities in the state.

Protect food security in New Mexico and the nation by submitting your public comment! Deadline: April 2, 2019.

Submit your comment here: https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2019/02/01/2018-28059/supplemental-nutrition-assis

Below is some content to include in your comment. To maximize its impact, make sure your comment has at least one third original text. 

Food for the hungry shouldn’t have a time limit!

  • This rule will only increase hunger. The adults who would be affected by the new rule are some of the lowest income of all SNAP participants. USDA data shows that those likely to be cut off by the time limit have average monthly income of about 17 percent of the poverty line.
  • There is no evidence that the rule increases employment or earnings, but data from states that implemented the time limit, show that the vast majority of adults simply lost SNAP benefits without finding employment.
  • Food banks and charities cannot fill the need. Roadrunner Food Bank reports that they have increased their distribution of food by 70 percent over the last ten years, but it is still not enough.
  • Losing SNAP hurts grocers and our local economies. SNAP benefits are spent at more than 1,588 authorized retailers in New Mexico, including grocers and local food retailers around the state. About $693 million of SNAP benefits were redeemed in New Mexico in 2016. The average New Mexico SNAP benefit in FY 2017 was $121. When multiplied by the 27,244 people who could lose benefits under the proposed rule, up to $3,296,524 federal dollars could leave the state.
  • New Mexico could lose more than $5.5 million in economic activity because SNAP dollars have a multiplier effect. $1.7 dollars is generated for every SNAP dollar spent.
  • Losing SNAP will mean an increase in public healthcare costs. A study published by the American Medical Association found that on average SNAP participation lowers an individual’s health care expenditures by approximately $1,447 per year.
  • The rule sidesteps Congress, which rejected these changes in the 2018 farm bill.
  • The rule is costly and difficult for New Mexico to administer. Governor Martinez attempted to implement these requirements despite New Mexico’s high unemployment. The federal court found that the state could not implement the requirements without terminating assistance to eligible adults.

More information about SNAP in New Mexico:
https://www.cbpp.org/research/food-assistance/a-closer-look-at-who-benefits-from-snap-state-by-state-fact-sheets#New_Mexico