5 things you should know about your rights as a worker during coronavirus

By Stephanie Welch, director of Workers’ Rights

Termination
Your employer can’t fire you if you are placed in isolation or quarantine. Employers who violate this legal protection could owe up to $5,000 in penalties.

Unemployment
If you are laid off or furloughed because of COVID-19, you are eligible for unemployment benefits. Contact the Department of Workforce Solutions for more information. . You can apply for unemployment benefits online at www.jobs.state.nm.us or by calling DWS at (877) 664-6984.

Privacy Rights
Your employer has to keep all medical information about you private and confidential. This includes if you have the coronavirus.

Discrimination
It is illegal for employers to mistreat you because of your race, national origin, or ethnic background. This means your employer can’t treat you differently than your coworkers because you are Asian or from another country affected by coronavirus. Contact the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission if you are facing discrimination at work. 

Sick Leave
If your employer provides you with paid sick leave when you are ill or need medical treatment, it must allow you to take that paid leave to care for a family member. Family member means a spouse or domestic partner, parent, grandparent, great-grandparent, child, foster child, grandchild, great-grandchild, brother, sister, niece, nephew, aunt, or uncle.

Please call 505-255-2840 with any questions. Watch the video in English or Spanish. Get the handout in English or Spanish.

5 things you should know about the new public charge rule

By Teague González, director of Public Benefits

Changes to the “Public Charge” rule go into effect today. Some of the changes include allowing the government to deny permanent residency (green cards) and visa renewals to certain lawfully present immigrants who participate in basic need programs like Medicaid, SNAP food assistance, and housing assistance.

The Trump administration is counting on fear to harm immigrant families and turn lifesaving programs against families. But the new public charge rule change applies to very few immigrants. Get all the facts and always talk to someone to make the best choices for your family.

Here are 5 important things you need to know about public charge:

Number 1: The test does not apply to people who are already legal permanent residents — as long as they don’t leave the US for 6 consecutive months. 
Number 2: The rule does not apply to people who want to adjust from legal permanent resident to citizens. 
Number 3: It never applies to US citizen children. A US citizen child’s use of benefits is never counted against their parent no matter the parent’s immigration status. Please do not disenroll or cancel your US citizen children from Medicaid or Food Stamps without talking to someone first. 
Number 4: There are important exceptions to the public charge rule, for example, pregnant women may receive Medicaid during their pregnancies and up to 60 days after delivery and this will not be counted against them when they try to become legal permanent residents. The same goes for Medicaid use by children under 21 years of age who want to become legal permanent residents. 
Many categories of immigrants are exempt from the rule like T and U Visa holders, as are VAWA beneficiaries, and many other statuses. 
Number 5: Many government benefits are not included in the public charge rule like school breakfast and lunch, WIC, CHIP, unemployment benefits and many more. 

This is why it is very important that you talk with someone about the rule change before you make any decisions about canceling your benefits or your children’s benefits. 

Please call 505-255-2840 with any questions. Watch the video in English and Spanish. Get the handout in English or Spanish.