Join the #GivingTuesdayNM movement!

November 28 is Giving Tuesday, a global day of giving. We invite you to join the movement! Consider a gift to the New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty to help us continue our fight for economic and social justice in New Mexico.

Click here to make a secure online donation! Then share your generous spirit on Facebook, using the hashtags #Unselfie and #GivingTuesdayNM.

By making your gift to the New Mexico Center Law and Poverty on #GivingTuesday, your dollars will go twice as far thanks to our generous sponsors! By donating on November 28, your gift will be matched dollar for dollar, up to $1,200 by the following companies:

Bogardus & Scott

State Employees Credit Union

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A huge thank you to our #GivingTuesdayNM sponsors!

Follow us all day on Facebook and Twitter on Giving Tuesday to learn about our bold and successful advocacy to defend access to healthcare, promote food security, remove barriers to meaningful employment, transform New Mexico’s educational system, and much more in 2017.

UNM Hospital Stops Requiring Low-Income, Uninsured Patients to Pay 50 Percent Down Payment for Surgery

ALBUQUERQUE, NM–After months of intense pressure from advocates, the UNM Hospital Board of Trustees reversed a policy, implemented in May 2017, requiring low-income, uninsured patients to pay a 50 percent down payment before surgeries. As a result of the policy, the hospital cancelled many patients’ surgeries because the patients couldn’t come up with thousands of dollars upfront to repair hernias, torn knee ligaments, broken bones, and in one case, a hysterectomy.

“We are relieved that the Hospital Board of Trustees has finally decided to treat all people with the same compassion and standard of care that insured people receive,” said Michelle Melendez, director of EleValle: South Valley Healthy Communities Collaborative. “Requiring people to pay 50 percent upfront was inhumane and not consistent with the mission of our public safety net hospital, which receives $96 million per year in property tax revenue to help cover indigent patients.”

The EleValle collaborative, which is comprised of Casa de Salud, Centro Savila, and ACCESS, teamed up with the New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty, Juntos Para la Salud, and with patient navigators from Pathways to a Healthy Bernalillo County to educate the UNM Hospital Board of Trustees about the policy’s impact on low-income, uninsured residents of Bernalillo County. The Bernalillo County Commission and the state Legislative Health and Human Services Committee weighed in on the side of advocates.

“The hospital’s policies created an insurmountable barrier for low-income patients to get surgeries, impacting their livelihoods and forcing them to suffer through worsening medical conditions,” said Sireesha Manne, healthcare attorney at the New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty. “We are grateful for the collaborative effort of community groups, patient navigators, and policymakers to hold the hospital accountable to its public mission.”

The board voted unanimously at the hospital’s board meeting on Friday to change the hospital’s Patient Payment and Financial Assistance policies. It also voted unanimously to establish a new Discount Program Policy for low-income patients living in New Mexico who meet poverty guidelines, are ineligible for Medicaid, and unable to purchase private insurance on the Health Insurance Exchange.

The new policies reinstate the hospital’s affordable down payment schedule that had been in place from 2005 until May 2017. Pathways navigators became aware of the hospital’s change in policy when clients who were seeking help with food, housing, transportation, and other basic needs disclosed that they were unable to work because of knee injuries and other debilitating medical conditions but could not afford a 50 percent down payment.

The reinstated schedule allows patients to pay $25, $75, or $300, depending on their level of poverty, upfront for surgeries that have been deemed medically necessary by their healthcare providers. The patients are then required to make monthly payments on the balance owed, which could be tens of thousands of dollars.

At the Friday meeting, Jerry McDowell, UNM Hospital board chairman, said, “There are some basic values that I think guide us: Do no harm to the patient. Consistent with our public service mission, serve all individuals with fairness, respect and dignity. Strive for best in class for quality, safety, and care. There are also legal guidelines overarching.”

Human Services Department to Hold Hearing on Medicaid Cuts on Monday, October 30

ALBUQUERQUE, NM—New Mexico’s Human Services Department (HSD) will hold a hearing on the serious cuts the Medicaid program faces in the Centennial Care 2.0 waiver proposal on Monday, October 30 at the National Hispanic Cultural Center in Albuquerque. This will be the final public hearing on the issue.

The waiver proposal eliminates important coverage and health benefits and imposes new excessive patient fees in the form of co-pays and premiums on the working disabled, low-income adults living just above the poverty line, and children enrolled in the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). These fees will prevent people from seeking necessary healthcare and cause thousands of others to lose coverage.

WHAT:
HSD Hearing on the Centennial Care 2.0 Waiver Proposal

WHEN:
5:30-7:30 p.m., October 30, 2017

WHERE:          
National Hispanic Cultural Center’s Bank of America Theatre
1701 4th Street SW
Albuquerque, NM, 87102

Call in Number: 1-888-757-2790
Participant code: 991379#

WHO:

  • HSD staff
  • Abuko Estrada, attorney at the New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty and other groups against the waiver
  • Public Comment

Healthy Workforce ABQ to Continue Fight for Workers’ Right to Earn Paid Sick Leave 

ALBUQUERQUE, NM – Healthy Workforce ABQ, the campaign behind the proposed ordinance for earned sick days, vowed today to continue its fight to ensure that all workers have access to earned paid sick leave, after unofficial election returns showed a narrow margin of 718 more votes against the ordinance.

“No one should have to choose between a paycheck and their health or taking care of a sick child,” said Andrea Serrano, Executive Director of OLE. “Throughout this campaign, we talked with workers, families, and small business owners who agreed Albuquerque workers need the right to earn sick days. But this ordinance faced great odds. Well-connected business interests undertook a campaign of misinformation that confused both the press and voters about the provisions of the law. The measure was relegated to the back of the ballot, without a summary, in illegible seven point font that many people could not read. This election doesn’t change the fact that everyone agrees Albuquerque workers should have the basic right to earn sick leave. We will continue to fight for it.”

Local community organizations have been working tirelessly to educate the public on the earned sick leave initiative since last summer, when over 24,000 voters in Albuquerque signed the petition to get it on the ballot.

“I have never had earned paid sick days. I have a child with autism, and many times I have had to choose between taking him to his medical appointments or not receiving a day’s worth of pay,” said Edgar Salinas, a low-wage immigrant worker and an active member of EL CENTRO de Igualdad y Derechos. “My situation is not unique. Tens of thousands of workers are taking care of children and elderly parents. It is reprehensible that well-funded groups, driven by ideology instead of sound policy, choose to undermine working families’ ability to care for one another rather than strengthen and support the workers who are a cornerstone of the economy. We, Albuquerque’s working families, will continue to fight for our rights to support our families and strengthen Albuquerque. La lucha sigue!”

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Healthy Workforce ABQ is supported by Organizers in the Land of Enchantment (OLE), Strong Families New Mexico, El CENTRO de Igualdad y Derechos, New Mexico Working Families Party, the New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty, the Center for Civic Policy, and Southwest Organizing Project (SWOP).

URGENT! Tell Steve Pearce to Protect Federal Food Assistance!

This Thursday Congress is expected to vote on the FY 2018 House Budget Resolution, which contains harsh cuts to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as food stamps and other poverty reduction programs. SNAP has been instrumental in helping struggling families put food on the table. But the plan envisions a total SNAP cut of $150 billion (more than 20 percent) over ten years.

If implemented, the resolution would pull the rug out beneath 464,102 New Mexicans who participate in the program, including 199,286 children, the elderly, and people with disabilities, while the wealthiest Americans and profitable corporations would get huge tax cuts.

As New Mexico’s Most Important Anti-Hunger Program, SNAP:

  • Improves the Health of Young Children – Nearly half (46%) of New Mexican children under age four rely on SNAP benefits to eat.  SNAP is proven to increase health and learning outcomes in young children by supporting brain development through adequate nutrition.
  • Supports Working Families – SNAP supports working New Mexicans.  Half of New Mexico SNAP participants are in working families. SNAP is also a critical support as New Mexico continues to have an unemployment rate that is significantly higher than the national average.
  • Boosts New Mexico’s Economy – SNAP benefits pumped $693 million dollars in the New Mexico economy. Every dollar of federal SNAP benefits spent in New Mexico generates $1.70 in economic activity.

Please call Representative Steve Pearce TODAY and urge him to oppose the house budget reconciliation.

Representatives Michelle Lujan Grisham and Ben Lujan are working hard to protect funding for SNAP. However, we need to make sure Representative Steve Pearce takes action to protect this critical program.

Call Representative Steve Pearce at his Washington D.C. office: (202) 225-2365.

Healthcare Repeal Effort Comes to an End, Saving Medicaid Funds for New Mexico

WASHINGTON DC— Republicans in Congress decided today to end their push on the Graham-Cassidy bill to repeal the Affordable Care Act, because they do not have enough votes in their party to pass it through the Senate. Their decision comes after the Congressional Budget Office released a preliminary report yesterday that concluded millions of Americans would lose their healthcare coverage under the legislation, mostly due to significant cuts to Medicaid. The bill would have ended Medicaid Expansion for low-income adults and resulted in New Mexico losing billions of federal dollars over the next ten years.

“Medicaid has greatly improved the physical and economic health of New Mexico,” said Sireesha Manne, an attorney with the New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty. “This bill suffered the same problems as older versions. It would have ripped away healthcare coverage from millions of people and permanently damaged Medicaid – a cornerstone of our healthcare system.”

The bill would have ended the Medicaid Expansion that provides healthcare coverage to more than 255,000 low-income adult New Mexicans, and resulted in New Mexico losing $9 billion federal dollars by the year 2027, according to the nonpartisan research group Avalere. The bill capped funding for the entire Medicaid program and eliminated tax credits that help people buy insurance. States would have been allowed to let insurance plans stop covering essential health benefits and to charge more to consumers with pre-existing conditions.

“New Mexico would have been forced to pay billions more in healthcare costs or slash Medicaid coverage for more than 230,000 people and cut services for the most vulnerable populations – including children, seniors, and people with disabilities,” said Manne.

The bill faced widespread opposition from state officials, consumer groups, and medical and industry groups. It also proved to be unpopular among Americans, with a CBS News Poll showing 52% of respondents disapproving the bill and only 20% in approval. A statewide poll conducted in New Mexico earlier this year by Research & Polling, Inc. found that nearly three-quarters of New Mexicans are opposed to reducing federal funding for Medicaid, and four out of five voters believe Medicaid is “important” or “very important” to residents.

Legislative Health and Human Services Committee to Hold Hearing on Medicaid Cuts Today

ALBUQUERQUE, NM—The New Mexico Legislative Health and Human Services (LHHS) Committee will hold a hearing today, starting at 12:30 p.m., on the serious cuts the Medicaid program faces in the Human Services Department’s (HSD) Centennial Care 2.0 waiver proposal. The hearing will take place at the Science and Technology Center Rotunda at UNM, 801 University Blvd. SE in Albuquerque, NM.

The proposal eliminates certain coverage and health benefits for low-income patients and imposes new patient fees in the form of co-pays and premiums to children enrolled in the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), the working disabled, and low-income adults living just above the poverty line.

“Medicaid has worked well for New Mexico. The state should focus on ensuring our families can get the care they need to stay healthy, not cut coverage for the people who can least afford it,” said Abuko D. Estrada, an attorney with the New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty. “At a time when our economy is struggling, these cuts will drive families into further financial hardships and throw away federal funding that helps sustain thousands of jobs.”

Currently for every state dollar New Mexico invests in Medicaid, the state receives four dollars back from the federal government. The Centennial Care 2.0 waiver proposal cuts will result in the loss of federal money for Medicaid that supports over 50,000 jobs and helps drive the New Mexico economy.

Centennial Care 2.0’s most harmful cuts to Medicaid include:

  • Charging low-income patients with new fees in the form of co-pays and premiums for children in CHIP, the working disabled, and low-income adults living just above the poverty line, which could result in thousands of people losing coverage altogether (as studies have shown);
  • Eliminating retroactive coverage protection that pays for Medicaid applicants’ past medical bills, from three months prior to applying for Medicaid, putting New Mexico’s families in severe medical debt and leaving healthcare providers with uncompensated care costs;
  • Ending a transitional Medicaid program that will result in coverage loss for families that have been living in deep poverty, creating financial hardships and interrupting health coverage when they enter new jobs or accept raises that place them just above the eligibility threshold for Medicaid; and
  • Reducing important health benefits for very low-income adults with dependent children, eliminating Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic, and Treatment (EPSDT) protections for children who are 19 and 20 year olds, and opening the door for the HSD secretary to make drastic cuts to more benefits in the future.

WHAT:
LHHS Committee Hearing on the Centennial Care 2.0 Waiver Proposal

WHO/WHEN:       
12:30 p.m.
Presentations about Concerns about Medicaid Cuts
Abuko D. Estrada, Attorney, New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty
David Machledt, Ph.D., Senior Policy Analyst, National Health Law Program

2:30 p.m.
Presentation on Medicaid Waiver
HSD Secretary Brent Earnest

4:30 p.m.
Public Comment

WHERE:   
Science and Technology Center Rotunda at UNM
801 University Blvd SE
Albuquerque, NM

Today’s hearing will be the only opportunity for providing comments in Albuquerque. Other public meetings will take place in Santa Fe, Las Cruces, and Las Vegas.

 

Legislative Health and Human Services Committee to Hold Hearing Tomorrow on Medicaid Cuts

ALBUQUERQUE, NM—The Legislative Health and Human Services (LHHS) Committee will hold a hearing on Medicaid, Wednesday, September 20, about the serious cuts the program faces in the Human Services Department’s (HSD) Centennial Care 2.0 waiver proposal.

The proposal eliminates certain coverage and health benefits and imposes new excessive patient fees in the form of co-pays and premiums to children enrolled in the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), the working disabled, and low-income adults living just above the poverty line. These fees will prevent people from seeking necessary healthcare and cause thousands of others to lose coverage.

WHAT:
LHHS Committee Hearing on the Centennial Care 2.0 Waiver Proposal

WHERE:
Science and Technology Center Rotunda at UNM
801 University Blvd SE
Albuquerque, NM

WHO/WHEN:
12:30 pm: Presentation on Concerns with Centennial Care 2.0 Proposal
Abuko D. Estrada, Attorney, New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty
David Machledt, Ph.D., Senior Policy Analyst, National Health Law Program

2:30 pm: HSD presentation on Centennial Care 2.0 Proposal
HSD Secretary Brent Earnest

4:30 pm: Public Comment

 

Court Rejects Challenge to Earned Sick Leave Law

Ruling Ensures Healthy Workforce Ordinance Will Appear on October 3 Municipal Ballot

 

ALBUQUERQUE, NM — Today, in a victory for Albuquerque’s working families, Honorable Judge Shannon Bacon threw out a challenge by business lobbyists to the Albuquerque Healthy Workforce Ordinance. Today’s ruling ensures that voters will have an opportunity to vote on earned sick days this fall at the October 3, 2017 municipal election.

“Low wage and immigrant workers play a critical role in Albuquerque’s economy, yet they are disproportionately impacted by attacks on minimum wage and efforts to undermine the proposed paid sick leave ordinance,” said Marco Nunez, Worker Justice Coordinator, EL CENTRO de Igualdad y Derechos.  “This victory sends a clear message to corporate interests that prioritize profit over the well-being of our families that our communities will not stand by idly as they attack and chip away at workers’ rights.”

Judge Bacon also upheld voters’ right to vote on citizen-initiated ballot initiatives, rejecting the business interests’ attempt to strike the voters’ democratic rights from the Albuquerque City Charter.

“Albuquerque residents’ right to directly participate in the lawmaking process is a cornerstone of our local democracy,” said Tim Davis, an attorney with the New Mexico Center in Law and Poverty, who argued the case for the community organizations. “Today’s ruling protects this right from attacks by well-connected business interests.”

The ruling arose out of a lawsuit filed against the city by business lobbyists who wanted to remove the earned sick ordinance from the October 2017 ballot. They also sought to cut the minimum wage, which was overwhelmingly passed by voters in 2012, from $8.80 to $7.50. Community organizations and voters who support both laws intervened in the case to defend them.

The judge also tossed out the challenge to the Albuquerque minimum wage in an oral ruling from the bench yesterday, ruling that the results of the 2012 general election are final and cannot be challenged now. She issued a written opinion today reaffirming her oral ruling. Together with her ruling on the Healthy Workforce Ordinance, today’s rulings dismiss all claims in the lawsuit on both ordinances.

The earned sick leave ballot initiative, if passed, would give workers the right to earn sick leave to recover from illness or care for ill family members. Local community organizations have been working to educate the public on the earned sick leave initiative since last summer, when over 24,000 voters in Albuquerque signed the petition in support of it.

The Healthy Workforce ABQ Ordinance can be read online here: https://healthyworkforceabq.org/full-language-of-ordinance/

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