City of Las Cruces advocates for ‘Medicaid Buy-in’

City Council moved by local support and statewide momentum

LAS CRUCES–The City Council of Las Cruces, after hearing testimony from NM Together for Healthcare family leaders who live in Doña Ana County, unanimously passed a resolution today in favor of continuing the state’s efforts in pursuing a Medicaid Buy-in plan–an innovative policy that would give New Mexicans the option to buy into Medicaid even if they are not currently eligible.

“I have been a promotora, a community health worker, for 15 years in Doña Ana County and have seen the great impact that lack of medical coverage has on New Mexico’s families,” said Maxi Urrutia, a Doña Ana County resident and Strong Families New Mexico healthcare advocate.

“Over 25,000 Doña Ana County residents currently don’t have health insurance, and my parents were a part of this group. They had to choose between paying for life-saving medical treatment and rent. No one should have to make that choice. We need to provide everyone with healthcare coverage they can afford.”

Urrutia is part of NM Together for Healthcare, a family-driven campaign of community members and organizations striving to ensure that every New Mexican has access to quality, affordable healthcare.

NM Together for Healthcare’s families have been blazing a trail in healthcare reform in New Mexico by building support with decision makers statewide. Since July, local governments and tribal councils have unanimously passed six resolutions in support of exploring a Medicaid buy-in plan.

Allowing Las Cruces residents to buy into Medicaid would provide families whose employers do not offer healthcare insurance with affordable healthcare coverage. Families without health insurance do not get the medical care they need and often forego necessary medical treatment because it is too expensive.

“My father was a custodian in the public schools for over 20 years and had no medical coverage when he retired,” said Urrutia. “Both he and mother were diagnosed with serious medical conditions and weren’t able to get the treatment they needed because they didn’t have enough money. They both died from lack of medical attention.”

During the 2018 legislative session, memorials passed with bipartisan support in the New Mexico House and Senate in 2018, authorizing a study of the Medicaid Buy-in plan.

“My parents deserved a better way of living. They would still be here if they had access to medical coverage. That is why I am advocating healthcare for every New Mexican and support the Medicaid Buy-in,” said Urrutia.

The Las Cruces City Council will include this resolution in their legislative requests for the upcoming 2019 session and share the resolution with state legislators.

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NM Together for Healthcare is a statewide, multiracial campaign of families and community organizations working together to strengthen healthcare access in New Mexico, supported by Strong Families New MexicoPartnership for Community ActionNew Mexico Center on Law and Poverty and Health Action New Mexico. For information, visit http://nmtogether4health.org/ or email: nmtogether4healthcare@gmail.com.

Governor-elect can stop harmful Medicaid cuts

ALBUQUERQUE—Governor-elect Michelle Lujan-Grisham should quash serious cuts New Mexico’s Medicaid program faces in the Centennial Care 2.0 waiver approved today by the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The cuts, proposed by the Human Services Department under the Susana Martinez administration, would hurt families and violate federal law according to the New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty.

HSD’s Centennial Care 2.0 waiver proposal asked the federal government for permission to increase New Mexico’s Medicaid premiums and cut retroactive coverage. The cuts are scheduled to roll out in 2019 over a series of months.

“No one should have to choose between putting food on the table and healthcare, but that’s exactly what these cuts would do,” said William Townley, an attorney with the New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty. “We have vastly improved the health of our state by expanding the number of New Mexicans eligible for Medicaid. These cuts would have a devastating impact on our state’s families and our economy. We urge Governor-elect Lujan-Grisham to rescind or amend these harmful cuts in Centennial Care 2.0.”

HSD’s proposal imposes new patient premiums on low-income adults living just above the poverty line. Research has shown that these fees will cause thousands of New Mexicans to lose healthcare coverage. For many low-income families, the proposed increase to ten dollars a month is prohibitive and would force them to choose between healthcare and other necessities like food, housing, and transportation. In Oregon where similar premiums were imposed, 50,000 people lost coverage within nine months of the new policy.

HSD’s proposed cuts would also phase-out retroactive coverage, which pays for a Medicaid eligible person’s hospital and medical bills incurred up to three months before signing up for Medicaid. Hospital bills are especially devastating for families on limited income, often ranging from $10,000 to over $100,000. Phasing out retroactive coverage would put New Mexico’s families in jeopardy of severe medical debt and force healthcare providers to shoulder increased uncompensated care costs.

“Under federal law, CMS is only allowed to waive certain provisions in Medicaid. CMS ignored those prohibitions today, approving cuts that will reduce access to healthcare coverage and increase medical debt for New Mexico’s families,” said Abuko D. Estrada, supervising attorney for Healthcare with the New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty.

It would not be unusual for the governor-elect to rescind approved cuts. After being pressured by healthcare advocates, HSD already removed or scaled back a number of harmful provisions in earlier versions of Centennial Care 2.0, including removing premium requirements for additional groups of Medicaid enrollees, removing penalties for missed appointments, and limiting benefits and services for parent/caretakers and children enrolled in the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP).

New Mexico Indian Affairs Committee to hear how landmark education ruling could impact Native American students

SANTA FE—Today New Mexico’s Indian Affairs Committee will hear how the recent court decision on New Mexico’s education system could impact Native American students.

The landmark ruling on the consolidated lawsuit Yazzie/Martinez v. State of New Mexico found that the state has failed to provide students—and in particular economically disadvantaged, Native American, and English language learner students—with sufficient educational opportunities as required by the state constitution, the Indian Education Act, and other state laws. The lawsuit was brought by families and school districts represented by the New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty and the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund.

Center staff will present the IAC with evidence that New Mexico’s students are just as capable as others across the country. Unfortunately, historical and current injustices and lack of funding for programs and curricula proven to work have led to disparate outcomes for our state’s children, especially for Native students.

Center staff will also present parts of an education transformation platform—agreed upon by over a hundred people from across the state, including educators, advocates, tribal leaders, and families—that greatly expands access to culturally and linguistically relevant curricula, enhances teacher supports, and promotes proven, research-based programs such as universal pre-K and K-5 Plus, lowers class size, and increases funding for the At-Risk Index.

WHAT:    
Indian Affairs Committee hearing on Yazzie/Martinez v. State of New Mexico

WHEN:
Wednesday, November 28 at 10:15 a.m.

WHERE:
State Capitol, Room 322, 490 Old Santa Fe Trail, Santa Fe, NM 87501

WHO:
New Mexico Indian Affairs Committee
Preston Sanchez, attorney with the New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty

Doña Ana unanimously backs ‘Medicaid Buy-in’

County Commissioners moved by local support and statewide momentum

DONA ANA COUNTY—The Doña Ana Board of County Commissioners after hearing testimony from New Mexico Together for Healthcare family leaders who live in Doña Ana County, unanimously passed a resolution on Tuesday in favor of continuing the state’s efforts to shape a healthcare solution that would open up Medicaid for any New Mexican to buy into—regardless of their current Medicaid eligibility.

“Before I had Medicaid, I didn’t have insurance, and I was turned away when I went to the doctor,” said Maria Burciaga, a Doña Ana county resident and Strong Families New Mexico healthcare advocate. “I once saved $1500 to partially pay for a necessary treatment, but was told I could not get seen until I had the full amount, which was $4000. The expansion of Medicaid allowed me to access healthcare and get that treatment. We need to continue to pursue the Medicaid Buy-in to give even more access to even more people.”

Burciaga is part of NM Together for Healthcare, a family-driven, multi-racial campaign working statewide to provide healthcare access that is affordable to all New Mexicans.

Family leaders have been working tirelessly, reaching out to policy makers and building support in communities across New Mexico. ince July, six resolutions in support of studying a Medicaid Buy-in option have passed unanimously in local counties and city governments as well in sovereign nations across the state.

Community members, state and local experts and policymakers have become more interested in this innovative plan since the bipartisan passing of the Medicaid Buy-in memorials in the New Mexico House and Senate during the 2018 legislative session.

A Medicaid Buy-in plan would allow New Mexicans who are currently not eligible for Medicaid the option to buy into an affordable healthcare coverage plan that leverages Medicaid.

With more than 180,000 New Mexicans without health insurance, including over 25,000 Doña Ana County residents, a Medicaid Buy-in plan could substantially lower uninsured rates by utilizing the already popular and successful Medicaid model. Medicaid already covers over 830,000 New Mexicans, including over 104,000 Doña Ana County residents.

“I’m really passionate about this campaign because in 2014 I had kidney stones and couldn’t afford the surgery I needed, until I was able to access Medicaid. Without Medicaid, I would have had to take out a loan to cover the expenses and I would have gone into debt,” said Burciaga. “Having Medicaid has helped me to address my healthcare issues, and everyone should be able to afford to do this.”

The Doña Ana Board of County Commissioners will include this resolution in their legislative requests for the upcoming 2019 session and share the resolution with state legislators.

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NM Together for Healthcare is a statewide, multiracial campaign of families and community organizations working together to strengthen healthcare access in New Mexico, supported by Strong Families New Mexico, Partnership for Community Action, New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty and Health Action New Mexico. For information, visit http://nmtogether4health.org/ or email nmtogether4healthcare@gmail.com.

Proposed Medicaid cuts would force New Mexicans to go without healthcare

ALBUQUERQUE—New Mexico’s Human Services Department proposed cuts to Medicaid would hurt families and violate federal law, said the New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty in comments submitted yesterday on the department’s Centennial Care 2.0 waiver proposal.

“Everyone needs access to healthcare coverage,” said William Townley, an attorney with the New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty. “But HSD’s proposed cuts to Medicaid would force many New Mexican families to go into debt or simply drop coverage. That’s bad news for all of us. We know that when people go without healthcare, it’s much harder for them to maintain their financial stability, be productive in the workforce, or continue their education.”

HSD’s proposal imposes new patient premiums on low-income adults living just above the poverty line. Research has shown that these fees will cause thousands of New Mexicans to lose healthcare coverage. For many low-income families, the proposed increase to $10 a month is prohibitive and would force them to choose between healthcare and other necessities like food, housing, and transportation.

Hospital bills are especially devastating for families on limited income, often ranging from $10,000 to over $100,000. Yet, HSD’s proposed cuts would also phase-out retroactive coverage, which pays for a Medicaid eligible person’s hospital and medical bills incurred up to three months before signing up for Medicaid. Phasing out retroactive coverage would put New Mexico’s families in jeopardy of severe medical debt and force healthcare providers to shoulder increased uncompensated care costs.

New Mexicans have voiced overwhelming opposition to HSD’s proposed cuts to Medicaid. Throughout the entire Centennial Care 2.0 waiver application process, patients, providers, stakeholders, researchers, advocates and community members were nearly unanimously opposed to these changes.

HSD’s proposed Medicaid cuts also violate federal law. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) can only approve waivers of federal Medicaid requirements that are listed under Section 1115 of the Medicaid Act. Provisions that govern cost-sharing, such as premiums, and retroactive coverage are outside of Section 1115, meaning CMS lacks legal authority to waive such requirements. CMS has not yet approved the regulatory changes proposed in HSD’s new regulations.

The Center’s comments can be found here: http://nmpovertylaw.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/NMCLP-Comment-on-HSDs-Medicaid-Cuts2018-10-25.pdf

 

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The New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty is dedicated to advancing economic and social justice through education, advocacy, and litigation. We work with low-income New Mexicans to improve living conditions, increase opportunities, and protect the rights of people living in poverty.

 

Proposed Public Charge rule would increase hunger and poverty in New Mexico

ALBUQUERQUE—New Mexico organizations are fighting the Trump administration’s reckless new attack on our families: a greatly expanded “Public Charge” rule that essentially turns the U.S. immigration system into a pay-to-play game that unfairly favors the wealthy. If the proposed rule were to go into effect, it would allow the government to deny green cards and visa renewals to lawfully present immigrants who participate in programs that help with basic needs like medical care, food, and housing.

In New Mexico, immigrants make up a large part of our communities. Nearly one in 10 New Mexicans is an immigrant, and one in nine have immigrant parents. New Mexico stands to lose as many as 2,700 jobs and nearly $400 million in economic activity because eligible New Mexicans will forego federal benefits that flow directly into our local economy.

“Trump Charge is yet one more example of this administration’s agenda to target and persecute our communities,” said Fabiola Bawden, community organizer from El CENTRO de Igualdad y Derechos. “We are proud of the economic, cultural, and social contributions that immigrant communities make in New Mexico and across the nation. We are ONE New Mexico and must continue to resist Trump’s attempts to push our families into further poverty, strip away legal protections that keep our families together, and rob us of the opportunity to fully integrate into the civic and economic life of the state and country we call home.”

Trump’s new rule dramatically expands the list of programs that jeopardize immigration status to include nearly all available basic need programs like Medicaid, housing assistance, and SNAP food assistance. Currently, the Public Charge rule only considers receipt of cash benefits and institutional care as a reason to deny lawfully present immigrants visa renewals or to deny their application for legal residency.

“No one should ever have to choose between putting food on the table and keeping their family together,” said Sovereign Hager, legal director of the New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty. “At least 77,000 U.S. children in New Mexico live with at least one immigrant parent and are in a family that receives basic assistance. Kids who get assistance with basic needs are healthier, do better in school, and earn more in the future. If this rule goes into effect, we will all face the consequences for generations to come.”

The rule is in a public comment period until December 10, 2018. The Department of Homeland Security must consider all comments before it publishes a final rule in order for there to be a change to immigration law or policy.

“The Trump administration continues to target immigrant communities,” said Eduardo García of the New Mexico Immigrant Law Center. “This is an effort to create confusion and fear among immigrants and discourage immigration and the use of benefits for immigrant families who qualify. We encourage all New Mexicans to submit comments against the proposed rule and stand up against this drastic change in policy.”

The new rule will not be retroactive, so the current use of food and medical benefits do not fall under the proposed rule. The groups recommend that people concerned about their immigration status continue participating in benefits programs and speak to an immigration attorney. If the rule is approved, it will not go into effect immediately after it is published. Families will have time to make decisions about benefits then.

“Through our daily work, we witness the devastating impact that poverty and the associated toxic stress have on individuals’ and families’ psychological and emotional well-being. The Trump administration is attacking a significant portion of the hardworking families in our communities,” said William Wagner, PhD, LCSW, Director of Centro Savila. “We cannot sit by while the Trump administration increases hunger, poverty, and sickness in our nation while handing out deep tax cuts to the rich. This endangers our families, communities, our state, and our country.”

“Thousands of New Mexico children – most of whom are U.S. citizens – will likely lose access to services because their parents will terminate their health insurance, food assistance, and more as a result of these proposed changes to the public charge definition,” said James Jimenez, executive director of New Mexico Voices for Children, a child advocacy organization. “It’s unconscionable that the Trump administration would take actions that will harm children across the nation.”

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Centro Savila improves the mental health of our community by ensuring access to linguistically and culturally relevant, quality mental health and prevention services, education and healthcare professional development.

EL CENTRO de Igualdad y Derechos is a grassroots, immigrants’ rights and workers’ justice organization based in Central New Mexico that works with Latino immigrant communities and allies to defend, strengthen, and advance the rights of Albuquerque’s communities.

The New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty is dedicated to advancing economic and social justice through education, advocacy, and litigation. We work with low-income New Mexicans to improve living conditions, increase opportunities, and protect the rights of people living in poverty.

New Mexico Immigration Law Center advances justice and equity by empowering low-income immigrant communities through collaborative legal services, advocacy, and education.

New Mexico Voices for Children champions  public policies that improve the well-being of New Mexico’s children, families, and communities in the areas of health, education, and economics through credible research and effective advocacy.

HSD to Hold Hearing on Medicaid Cuts Wednesday

SANTA FE—New Mexico’s Human Services Department will hold a hearing on the serious cuts the Medicaid program faces in the Centennial Care 2.0 waiver proposal on Wednesday, October 24 in Santa Fe.

The waiver proposal imposes new excessive patient premiums on low-income adults living just above the poverty line. These fees will cause thousands of New Mexicans to lose healthcare coverage. The proposal would also phase out retroactive coverage, which is a protection that pays for a Medicaid eligible person’s hospital and medical bills incurred up to three months before signing up for Medicaid. Phasing out retroactive coverage would put New Mexico’s families in jeopardy of severe medical debt and leave healthcare providers with additional uncompensated care costs.

WHAT:
HSD Hearing on the Centennial Care 2.0 Waiver Proposal

WHEN:
9:00 a.m -12:00 p.m., October 24, 2018

WHERE:     
Rio Grande Conference Room, Toney Anaya Building, 2550 Cerrillos Rd, Santa Fe, NM 87505

WHO:
William Townley, attorney at the New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty and other groups against the waiver
HSD staff
Public Comment

Groups to hold press conference on Trump’s proposal to penalize immigrants who access basic assistance

Proposed “Public Charge” rule will increase hunger and poverty in New Mexico

ALBUQUERQUE—Economic justice and immigrant rights organizations will hold a press conference Wednesday at 11 a.m. to discuss how the Trump administration’s reckless new attack on immigrant families—a greatly expanded “Public Charge” rule—will impact New Mexico and how people can oppose it. If the proposed rule were to go into effect, it would allow the government to deny green cards and visa renewals to lawfully present immigrants who participate in programs that help with basic needs like medical care, food, and housing.

Trump’s new rule dramatically expands the list of programs that jeopardize immigration status to include nearly all available basic need programs like Medicaid, housing assistance, and SNAP, formerly known as food stamps. The Public Charge rule currently only considers receipt of cash benefits and institutional care as a reason to deny lawfully-present immigrants visa renewals or to deny their applications for legal residency.

WHAT:
Press conference on proposed Public Charge rule that would allow the government to deny green cards and visa renewals to lawfully-present immigrants who participate in programs that help with basic needs like medical care, food, and housing.

WHEN:
11 a.m., Wednesday, October 24, 2018

WHERE:
EL CENTRO de Igualdad y Derechos, 714 4th St SW, Albuquerque, NM 87102

WHO:
Centro Savila
EL CENTRO de Igualdad y Derechos
New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty
New Mexico Immigration Law Center

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Centro Savila improves the mental health of our community by ensuring access to linguistically and culturally relevant, quality mental health and prevention services, education and healthcare professional development.

EL CENTRO de Igualdad y Derechos is a grassroots, immigrants’ rights and workers’ justice organization based in Central New Mexico that works with Latino immigrant communities and allies to defend, strengthen, and advance the rights of our community.

The New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty is dedicated to advancing economic and social justice through education, advocacy, and litigation. We work with low-income New Mexicans to improve living conditions, increase opportunities, and protect the rights of people living in poverty.

New Mexico Immigration Law Center advances justice and equity by empowering low-income immigrant communities through collaborative legal services, advocacy, and education.

City of Albuquerque supports ‘Medicaid Buy-in’  

City Council moved by local and statewide support for innovative solution 

ALBUQUERQUE—The Albuquerque City Council, after hearing from NM Together for Healthcare leaders from Albuquerque, passed a resolution today that supports the state’s commitment to exploring a proposal that would allow anyone to buy into a low-cost healthcare plan through Medicaid—including the uninsured who don’t qualify for Medicaid now.

“I support the Medicaid Buy-in because we all have the right to good health, and access to low-cost options will help many people,” said Evelyn Ramos, a Partnership for Community Action healthcare advocate and Albuquerque resident. “Since I am uninsured, I know how difficult it is to find healthcare coverage. When I do find services, I am given appointments months away.
I have daughters who get sick often, so it has helped my family to have them covered by Medicaid. But not everyone is eligible for Medicaid. We should open it up for everyone to access good healthcare.”

The Medicaid Buy-in plan has been gaining support around the state with
the unanimous passage of similar resolutions by the All Pueblo Council of Governors and local governments, including the city of Sunland Park, the city of Anthony, Bernalillo County, and McKinley County. Medicaid Buy-in memorials passed with bipartisan support in the New Mexico House and Senate during the 2018 legislative session.

Medicaid is already a trusted, popular model that covers over 830,000
New Mexicans, including over 225,000 Bernalillo County residents. The plan would open up Medicaid for all New Mexican’s to buy into, providing low-cost coverage for the over 48,000 uninsured Bernalillo county residents. It would also provide affordable health insurance to individuals who are not eligible for Medicaid due to income or immigration status.

The plan could also help the economy by ensuring families have coverage to receive needed medical care before health conditions worsen, resulting in medical debt for families and uncompensated care costs for hospitals and providers.

“Without Medicaid, it would be extremely difficult for us to afford medical services for my daughters. We would probably go to the doctor in an emergency or when an illness has worsened,” said Ramos. “But undocumented people do not have access to Medicaid. It is important for us to find what we have in common—we all need good health.”

The Albuquerque City Council will share the resolution with state legislators and include this resolution in their legislative requests for the upcoming 2019 session.

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NM Together for Healthcare is a statewide, multiracial campaign of families and community organizations working together to strengthen healthcare access in New Mexico supported by Strong Families New MexicoPartnership for Community ActionNew Mexico Center on Law and Poverty, and Health Action New Mexico. For information, visit http://nmtogether4health.org/ or email: nmtogether4healthcare@gmail.com.

City of Albuquerque to consider supporting innovative ‘Medicaid buy-in’ option today

ALBUQUERQUE—Albuquerque healthcare leaders in the New Mexico Together for Healthcare campaign will present a resolution to the Albuquerque City Council today that supports the state’s exploration of an innovative plan that would allow New Mexicans to buy-in to the proven, trusted Medicaid healthcare system. The city council is expected to pass the resolution at its 5 p.m. meeting this evening.

The buy-in plan would allow New Mexicans to buy into the Medicaid program for healthcare coverage—even if they are not currently eligible for Medicaid— providing a more affordable, high-quality healthcare coverage option.

With more than 48,000 people in Bernalillo County currently without health insurance, a Medicaid buy-in plan would make quality healthcare coverage more accessible for many local residents. Albuquerqueans have reached out to the city councilors and urged them to support the resolution.

WHAT:  
The Albuquerque City Council will vote on an important resolution supporting the state’s work to explore a Medicaid Buy-in plan.

WHEN:   
5 p.m., Monday, October 1, 2018

WHERE:     
Albuquerque/Bernalillo County Government Center, One Civic Plaza, Albuquerque, NM 87102

WHO: 
Albuquerque City Council
New Mexico Together for Healthcare leaders

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NM Together for Healthcare is a statewide, multiracial campaign of families and community organizations working together to strengthen healthcare access in New Mexico, supported by Strong Families New Mexico, Partnership for Community Action, New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty and Health Action New Mexico. For information, visit http://nmtogether4health.org/ or email: nmtogether4healthcare@gmail.com.