Families and School Districts Ask Court to Find that State Failed Its Legal Obligation to School Age Children 

SANTA FE, NM—In a pre-trial hearing starting Monday, May 22, the New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty (the Center) will ask the First Judicial District Court to find that the State has failed to meet its constitutional obligation to provide children the supports necessary to learn and succeed. The Center will also ask the Court to rule that the State’s system of education is unconstitutional as it applies to Native American students.

“Education is a right, not a privilege. It’s time for the State of New Mexico to step up and meet its constitutional responsibility to provide public schools the resources and programming they need to promote the success of all children,” said Edward Tabet-Cubero, Executive Director of the Center. “It is unacceptable that a vast majority of our children cannot read, write, or do math at grade level. The State is failing our kids.”

The Center’s Motions for Summary Judgement in the lawsuit, Yazzie v. State of New Mexico, are on behalf of a group of New Mexico families and school districts including Gallup, Rio Rancho, Santa Fe, Cuba, Moriarty/Edgewood, and Lake Arthur. The families represented have children who are English language learners (ELL), Native American or economically disadvantaged and have been negatively impacted by the lack of resources provided to New Mexico public schools.

Marsha Leno, one of the plaintiffs in the case, lives in McCartys in western New Mexico. Five of her six children are enrolled in Cibola-Grants County Schools (GCCS). Like many families in the district, Marsha and the children speak both Keres and English at home. Her children have struggled in English Language Arts and other courses that require writing. Unfortunately, the district lacks an adequate bilingual and English as a second language program for Native American students. The GCCS superintendent told Leno that the district lacks adequate funding to address these problems.

The Center’s lawsuit seeks for the Court to order and hold the State accountable to meet its legal responsibility to provide the programming and resources necessary for all public school students to succeed. The lawsuit also seeks to ensure that funds are distributed equitably, including for economically disadvantaged, Native American, and English language learner students.

“The State of New Mexico has been starving its public schools for years and legislation continues to fail,” said Lauren Winkler, one of the Center’s attorneys working on the case. “Our kids are just as smart and motivated as other children across the country. We have loving families, committed teachers, and communities dedicated to their children’s education. But our schools have tried to do more with less, and it’s our children who are suffering from the State’s failure.”

Yazzie v. State of New Mexico was originally filed in March 2014 and consolidated with a similar case, Martinez v State of New Mexico. The Martinez parents and children hail from Española, Santa Fe, Albuquerque, Zuni, Magdalena, Las Cruces, and Gadsden.

The consolidated lawsuit goes to trial on June 12, 2017.

Legal counsel on the Yazzie lawsuit include Gail Evans, Preston Sanchez, Christopher Sanchez, and Lauren Winkler of the Center along with co-counsel Daniel Yohalem and Mark D. Fine.

Legal documents in the case can be found here.

ACTION ALERT: Call Governor Now to Prevent Budget Cuts

Your action is needed urgently –   the House and Senate just sent a tax package today to Governor Martinez to help avert more deep budget cuts that would further slash funding for our schools, healthcare and public safety agencies. New Mexico is facing school closures and further reduction to classrooms and teachers, the elimination of certain Medicaid services for low-income families and people with disabilities, and a worsening public safety crisis from under-resourcing our courts and other key agencies.

House Bill 202 makes responsible and overdue changes to the tax code, including to level the playing field for small businesses by taxing out of state internet sellers, close up tax loopholes for certain industries, and update the gas tax so the funds can be invested into our roads.

Please call the Governor’s office at 505-476-2200. Ask her to sign HB202, and not to veto any part of it. Let her know that New Mexicans will not accept more budget cuts and that you support this tax package as a fair solution that does not hurt our families.  It will only take a minute to leave a message.

Governor and Legislature Must Change Course Fast to Fix the Budget Crisis, Put our Families First

Republished from the New Mexico Political Report. Also seen in the Albuquerque Journal and NM Politics.net

Kim-2015-09-23By Kim Posich, Executive Director of the New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty

New Mexico is in a budget crisis. Our state’s economy is in shambles. We have the worst employment rates in the country and revenue projections have dropped over $200 million dollars from just before the session and they could get even worse.

The result of this economic free fall will be continued under-funding of our schools, jobs, economic development and public safety efforts – all the things most important to New Mexicans. Time is running out at the state legislature. If lawmakers do not take clear aim at the challenges we face, New Mexico will strike out for our families and children.

Strike one will be the budget. Deep cuts are coming that will threaten jobs and public safety. Healthcare, driven by Medicaid, is one of the only growing job sectors in New Mexico yet Medicaid is short by over $60 million in the budget being considered by the legislature. If we cut Medicaid by $60 million, we lose over $140 million in federal matching dollars. The Human Services Department has been clear that there is no room to make cuts other than to reduce services and payments to healthcare providers.

Our schools are still grossly under-funded, shortchanging our children and hurting our prospects for attracting and keeping businesses in New Mexico. With the current budget, we cannot invest in our teachers, Pre-K programs and educational initiatives that have been proven to work in preparing children for academic success and graduation.

The budget also underfunds agencies important for public safety. The judicial branch is struggling with its caseload and the corrections department lacks needed staffing. Deep cuts are also in store for the state’s behavioral health system including crisis intervention services. These are all essential to the integrity of our justice and rehabilitation system and ensuring our communities are safe.

Strike two will be failing to raise revenues. There are sensible opportunities to increase revenues without raising taxes and harming our families. One such proposal is delaying recently passed corporate tax breaks for two years. New Mexico cannot afford them right now. Another opportunity is to increase distributions from our $15 billion permanent fund, to provide needed funds to our education system, including early childhood education.

There are also ways to rebalance our tax structure to make it less heavily reliant on working families. According to the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy, the lowest income New Mexicans are paying a higher percentage of their income on overall taxes than the highest income households. We could modify capital gains deductions that do not benefit most New Mexicans. We could modify income brackets and actually lower taxes for working and middle class New Mexican families who are the vast majority of our residents.

New Mexico is also still sitting on over $1 billion in unused capital funds, as the state auditor’s office has discovered. These funds could be recouped to fill one-time shortfalls and our reserves, and yet little action has been taken by the Governor’s office to mobilize this funding.

Strike three will be public safety. The best antidote to crime is to have good paying jobs, a strong education system and healthy communities. Unfortunately, many of the so-called “tough on crime” bills being proposed in the legislature will be ineffective at reducing crime. If we are serious about our safety, then we must invest in our communities, behavioral health, law enforcement training and the justice system. Right now, our budget lacks in all these areas.

We need to make New Mexico safe. We need good paying jobs. And most importantly, we need a school system that will do right by our children. There is still time to make a turnaround. The Governor and Legislature should step up to the plate to raise revenues. We need our leaders to fund a state budget that addresses our economic crisis and the needs of everyday New Mexicans.