Court must ensure NM kids’ right to sufficient education

By Gail Evans, Lead Attorney for plantiffs, Yazzie v. State of New Mexico
(This article appeared in the Albuquerque Journal.)

Our courts have the critical role of upholding the constitutional rights of our children. New Mexico’s Constitution guarantees children a sufficient education, one that prepares them for the rigors of college and the workforce. But for decades, our state has failed our students.

Our public education system is woefully insufficient, leading a district court to rule last July that the state is violating the constitutional rights of our students. After volumes of evidence and testimony from dozens of experts, the court found the state has not adequately invested in public education nor adopted the educational instruction and programs constitutionally required to close achievement gaps for N.M. students, especially low-income, Native American, English-language learners and students with disabilities.

The legislative process is a political one fraught with competing interests. For years, our children have been shortchanged by legislative budgets that have consistently underfunded public schools. Unfortunately, even after the court’s ruling, the Legislature this year only went part of the way in addressing the changes necessary.

While the funding allocated for public schools is higher than in recent years, it won’t even get us back to 2008 levels when adjusted for inflation. Like today, in 2008, our funding was insufficient and our state’s education outcomes ranked at or near the bottom nationally. Filling a hole that gets us back to 2008 levels of funding is not the investment in education our Constitution requires.

The increased funding will not be sufficient to ensure social services, counseling, health care and literacy specialists are available to all students who need them. It is not enough to cover basic instructional materials for the classroom, or to invest in our educators to attract and retain new teachers and expand their qualifications. It is not enough to ensure teaching is tailored to the unique cultural and linguistic needs of our students, including English-language learners and indigenous communities. And the transportation budget remains insufficient to ensure all students have the opportunity to participate in after-school and summer programs.

While the governor’s call for a “moonshot for education” is certainly the kind of vision we need, a moonshot requires sufficient investment of programs, services, time and money that we have yet to commit.

While it is encouraging our new governor will not appeal the Yazzie/Martinez ruling, she has now called for the court to vacate sections of the ruling. This will only further endanger our students’ life chances. The state should instead work to comply with the ruling and the Constitution; the future success of our children and New Mexico depends on it. Children should not be pawns in the political process. It is the role of the judicial branch to interpret and enforce the law. The court ruling requires us to act, mandating that we do better by our students. Our children are smart and capable, and rich in culture and diversity. We can provide an education system that serves all New Mexicans, regardless of their economic circumstances or cultural background.

I dream of a moonshot for education, too

By Wilhelmina Yazzie, lead plaintiff in the Yazzie/Martinez v. New Mexico lawsuit.
(This op-ed appeared in the Santa Fe New Mexican)

When it comes to providing a quality education for every child in New Mexico, the stakes are too high for the “wait and see” approach the Santa Fe New Mexican takes in its recent editorial (“Educators must take the lead in reforms,” Our View, March 24).

Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham has said she wants a “moonshot for education.” As the lead plaintiff in the Yazzie/Martinez v. state of New Mexico lawsuit, I, too, dream of a moonshot for my children and for all of New Mexico’s children. I am of the Diné (Navajo) tribe and we view our children as “sacred.” They are the heart of our existence, and it is our responsibility to prepare them for iiná, what we call “life” in my language.

Our state constitution mandates that the state of New Mexico is responsible for providing a sufficient education for all students. The state has not followed through on its obligation, and in her court ruling on our lawsuit, Judge Sarah Singleton agreed.

The Legislature had a chance this session to change course, but it did not go nearly far enough. The funding increases for public education passed in this legislative session only serve to backfill budgets and do not even return basic school programming to 2008 levels. They will not adequately cover the critical programs needed to improve outcomes for all students — especially for our Native American children, our Latino/Hispanic children, our English language learners, our low-income children and our children with special needs.

My children’s schools do not have enough textbooks. Our teachers do not have basic classroom supplies. When it comes to testing, my children do not score at grade level, despite getting good grades and being on honor roll. My children do not receive enough academic support and resources to get them ready for these tests, and they have to pass these tests to graduate. Our schools have limited after-school programs and tutoring.

Our schools also lack one of the most important teachings for our youth — cultural and language education. It is imperative that we bring culturally relevant programs and resources into our schools, especially at a time like this. Our children are yearning for their identity and values, and others are searching for acceptance.

Being culturally connected to our language and culture help us find purpose and guidance; it gives us confidence and motivation to excel in all that we do. It also teaches our children our way of life and the meaning of our existence, gives us pride in who we are and where we come from. It also teaches non-Native children and educators our history and with that knowledge brings respect for one another and creates hózhó (peace) between all people that we interact with. That is the path to balance and harmony.

I am asking our state and our lawmakers to address all these issues; to act upon the court’s ruling and honor the constitutional rights of our students. We need pre-K for every student. We need more multilingual teachers, and they deserve better pay. All classrooms should have access to textbooks, technology and other basic resources. Our children should be our first priority. They are the next generation, and all I want is for my children, your children, our children to receive the quality education that they deserve.

To transform our public education system, it will take the dedication and cooperation of every member of our community— from tribal leaders to educators and experts to parents. We need everyone at the table if we are to succeed at what is most important to us: helping our children realize their dreams.

Legislative Wrap Up 2019

Dear friends,

This legislative session was a turning point for New Mexico. The efforts of the Center on Law and Poverty and our partners paved the way for historic changes for our state and started long overdue dialogue about the bold changes that must be made for children and families. This could not have happened without you! THANK YOU for the countless phone calls, emails to your legislators, testimony in committee hearings, and sharing of information with your networks and through social media.

We have much to celebrate together and are especially proud to share several major victories.

Our advocacy efforts and expert testimony were instrumental in achieving:

Historic wins for workers in New Mexico
Domestic and home care workers are now protected by basic labor laws. Along with our partners, we successfully eliminated outdated, discriminatory practices in our state so people doing some of the toughest jobs, like caring for others’ loved ones and cleaning houses, are protected by New Mexico’s minimum wage standards and other wage protections.

After a decade of stagnant wages, hard working New Mexicans will finally get a raise. Hundreds of workers from across New Mexico mobilized in support of a wage increase this session. It was a long and challenging fight, but starting in January 2020, the state minimum wage will be raised to $9 an hour and increase annually until reaching $12 an hour in 2023. This will directly impact 150,901 workers in our state—nearly 20 percent of the workforce.

Loopholes closed in small loans laws
Everyone should be able to understand the terms of their loans, especially when these loans are taken out from storefront lenders. Our advocacy with our partners led to significantly more accountability and transparency by mandating that lenders report relevant data to the state and by aligning our small loan laws so all New Mexico families receive fairer loans.

Public education a top priority
After winning the Yazzie/Martinez court ruling on behalf of families and school districts, we joined with education, tribal and community leaders, and students to form the Transform Education NM coalition and used this historic opportunity to bring education to the forefront this legislative session. New Mexico’s education system must be rooted in a multicultural framework for our diverse student body, and our coalition won much needed funding for culturally and linguistically responsive instruction in rural areas. Overall, New Mexico saw an increase in education funding, and teachers got long overdue raises. However, we still have a long way to go, and we will not stop until every child has the education they need to succeed and are entitled to by the New Mexico Constitution. 

Progress toward innovative and affordable health coverage
Dozens of families, healthcare professionals, and advocates joined the NM Together for Healthcare campaign to work tirelessly for a Medicaid Buy-in option for New Mexicans who struggle to afford the outrageous costs of private insurance but don’t qualify for Medicaid. The Human Services Department will now receive funding to further study and begin the administrative development of a public option plan, including pursuing federal funding to help pay for it.

The path ahead
We’re focused on New Mexico’s future, and together with you, we will continue to push for complete transformation of our education system, expansion of early childhood education—including pre-K, childcare assistance and home visiting services—better pay and working conditions for workers, financial and food security, and access to healthcare for all of our families.

Sincerely,

Sireesha Manne                                                  
Executive Director

Governor signs bill to help rural school districts improve bilingual, multicultural education

HB 111 will support teachers with training to better serve culturally and linguistically diverse students, particularly in rural New Mexico

SANTA FE—Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham signed Representative Salazar’s HB 111, Cultural and Linguistic Education Support, funding Regional Education Cooperatives (RECs) to provide professional development to staff and teachers for culturally and linguistically responsive instruction.

“New Mexico is not like other states. Our diversity is our strength and it presents unique opportunities for how we leverage our multicultural and multilingual heritage to improve learning outcomes for students, regardless of their zip code,” said Rebecca Blum Martinez, professor and bilingual/ESL director, Department of Language, Literacy, & Sociocultural Studies, University of New Mexico’s College of Education. “Our education system has long been inequitable and unresponsive to the cultural and linguistic needs of our students, which research shows is critical to enabling students to learn and do well in school.”

HB 111 builds the capacity for Regional Education Cooperatives (RECs) to provide professional development for educators on culturally and linguistically responsive instruction. The bill provides funding for RECs to contract with local experts to offer strategies and techniques to most effectively teach culturally and linguistically diverse learners.

“Diverse students and their teachers across rural New Mexico face distinct challenges, only further compounded by the lack of training opportunities in multilingual and multicultural education,” said Edward Tabet-Cubero with Transform Education NM. “HB 111 creates a pathway for RECs to better serve students and improve outcomes.”

HB 111 is one key component of the Transform Education NM coalition platform to improve education outcomes for all New Mexico students. The platform is grounded in a multicultural, multilingual framework to reverse years of inadequate state investment in public education and close achievement gaps for New Mexico’s students, especially low-income, Native American, English-language learners, and students with disabilities. 

The bill’s primary sponsor was Representative Tomas Salazar and co-sponsors were Representative Linda Trujillo and Representative Derrick Lente.

Information on the Transform Education NM platform can be found here: https://transformeducationnm.org/our-platform/.  

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Transform Education NM is a coalition of educational leaders, families, tribal leaders, and the lawsuit plaintiffs working to transform the state’s education system for our students. To learn more, visit www.transformeducationnm.org.

ACTION ALERT: Ask the Senate Education Committee to Support Multicultural Education

March 7, 2019

In the final stretch of this legislative session, a number of bills supporting a more inclusive education system – one that supports the diverse languages and cultures of our students – will be decided on in committee this week.

Tomorrow, the Senate Education Committee will discuss HB 111, HB 120, and HB 159, and we need you to show your support for a multicultural education system. 

We know students perform better when their materials and coursework are relevant to their identity. HB 111, HB 120, and HB 159 each provide the support our public education system needs to honor the diverse languages, heritages, and cultures of New Mexico’s students in the classroom.

Please call the Senate Education Committee members and ask them to ensure our public education system will support the education of the culturally and linguistically diverse students of New Mexico. 

More on the Issues

HB 159 “Multicultural Education Framework” is sponsored by Representatives Tomás E. Salazar, Christine Trujillo, and Derrick J. Lente.

It aligns the New Mexico Indian Education Act, Hispanic Education Act, and Bilingual Multicultural Act to establish a foundation in the public education system for supporting the education of culturally and linguistically diverse students across New Mexico.

HB 111  “Cultural and Linguistic Education Support” is sponsored by Representatives Tomás E. Salazar, Linda M. Trujillo, and Derrick J. Lente

We know that students in rural New Mexico are underserved by the public education system, despite their success being just as critical to New Mexico’s future. Funding for rural school districts and cooperatives from HB 111 will build the capacity for teachers in these areas to gain the skills necessary to teach in bilingual and multicultural classrooms.

HB 120 “Bilingual Teacher Preparation Act” is sponsored by Representatives Tomás E. Salazar, Christine Trujillo, Joy Garratt, and Derrick J. Lente

Without bilingual teachers, we cannot adequately address the needs of our English language learner students. HB 120 will increase the number of bilingual and TESOL-endorsed teachers in New Mexico by making it possible for them to receive grants to help pay for degrees or endorsements in bilingual/multicultural education or TESOL.

What You Can Do

Please call members of the Senate Education Committee and ask for their support of HB 159, HB 111, and HB 120. 

Sen. Mimi Stewart | (505) 986-4726 | mimi.stewart@nmlegis.gov
Sen. William Soules | (505) 986-4834 | bill.soules@nmlegis.gov
Sen. Michael Padilla | (505) 986-4267 | michael.padilla@nmlegis.gov
Sen. Gabriel Ramos | (505) 986-4863 | gabriel.ramos@nmlegis.gov
Sen. Bill O’Neill | (505) 986-4260 | oneillsd13@billoneillfornm.com
Sen. Candace Gould | (505) 986-4266 | candace.gould@nmlegis.gov
Sen. Craig Brandt | (505) 986-4385 | craig.brandt@nmlegis.gov
Sen. Greg Fulfer | (505) 986-4278
gregg.fulfer@nmlegis.gov
Sen. John Pinto | (505) 986-4835

Court issues final ruling in landmark education lawsuit

Legislature’s proposed funding will not meet court’s mandate for transformation of education system

ALBUQUERQUE—Late Thursday, First Judicial District Court Judge Sarah Singleton issued a final ruling in Yazzie/Martinez v. State of New Mexico. The court found that the state has violated students’ constitutional rights to a sufficient education and ordered the state to provide educational programs, services, and funding to schools to prepare students so they are college and career ready.

The current proposed funding for education under discussion in the New Mexico Legislature will not suffice to meet the court’s mandate.

Current New Mexico Legislature education funding proposals are asking for an increase of $400 to $500 million—which amounts to a 15-18 percent increase in public school funding. Evidence at trial showed that public schools are receiving less funding now than in 2008, when adjusting for inflation. That data has since been updated to show that an increase of $409 million would only return New Mexico to 2008 education funding levels. In 2008, New Mexico was ranked at the bottom in the country in reading and math proficiency and was clearly not in compliance with New Mexico’s constitutional requirement. Reverting funding back to 2008 resources levels does not meet the court’s mandates to sufficiently fund programs and services for our children

“New Mexico’s students are legally entitled to the educational opportunities they need to succeed. This final judgement is yet another clear statement from the court that the state has a legal mandate to take immediate action to ensure that our students are getting the quality of education that they are constitutionally entitled to,” said Gail Evans, lead attorney for Yazzie plaintiffs in the Yazzie/Martinez v. State of New Mexico lawsuit. “To comply with the constitution, we must have a transformation of our educational system—nothing less is going to cut it. The system has failed our students for decades and that must stop now.”

The court made clear that students’ constitutional rights to a sufficient education cannot be violated so that the state can save funds. The court’s final judgement states, “The defendants must comply with their duty to provide an adequate education and may not conserve financial resources at the expense of our constitutional resources.”

The legislature’s current budget under consideration does not fully implement a multicultural and bilingual curriculum, does not adequately increase teacher pay and professional development to recruit and retain teachers, and does not ensure children have access to instructional materials, technology and transportation, and other basic services that are critical for educational success.

“Families and school districts have been struggling to work with the resources that they have,” said Tom Sullivan, former superintendent of Moriarty-Edgewood School District, which is a plaintiff in the Yazzie/Martinez lawsuit. “Most states’ education budgets have recovered from and surpassed pre-recession amounts, but in New Mexico, the current budget proposal is barely returning to 2008 levels when education was already underfunded.”

“We have an incredible opportunity to do the right thing for our students, our future,” said Mike Grossman, superintendent of Lake Arthur Municipal Schools, one of the smallest districts in New Mexico and a Yazzie plaintiff. “Governor Lujan-Grisham and new Public Education Department have expressed a strong commitment to our students and to public education. It is critical that they now step in and drive the major educational reforms and the big investments it will take to fix our schools.”

The court’s final judgement and order can be found here: http://nmpovertylaw.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/D-101-CV-2014-00793-Final-Judgment-and-Order-NCJ-1.pdf

Key legislation on multicultural education framework in New Mexico discussed by sponsors, education experts

SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO—Among the many education bills that are working their way through legislative committee, those sponsored by Representative Tomás E. Salazar are designed to ensure a multicultural, bilingual framework is at the core of the New Mexico education system. The bills must be passed in the House Appropriations Committee and receive funding to move forward in the legislature. The committee is currently considering the public school budgets and intends to finalize its budget bill by next week.

“More than 75 percent of New Mexico public school students are culturally and linguistically diverse. This diversity should be celebrated and must also be reflected in curriculum and teacher development,” said Representative Salazar. “Judge Singleton’s order is clear—we can no longer violate the constitutional rights of a majority of our students.”

HB 111, HB 120, and HB 159 were developed out of the Transform Education NM Platform, a comprehensive blueprint to fix New Mexico’s schools. Based on the input of 300+ diverse community stakeholders and two million pages of documentation and expert testimony of educators, economists, and academic researchers as part of the Yazzie/Martinez trial, the platform is the roadmap to successfully transforming the state’s education system.

“We know that a multicultural education is essential for our students to learn and succeed,” said Preston Sanchez, plaintiff attorney on the Yazzie lawsuit. “We urge our legislators and our governor to support these bills and to include them in HB 2. The success of New Mexico’s schools depends on making sure these bills are passed and fully funded.”

Research shows a multicultural and multilingual education approach allows students to maintain their language and identity, resulting in a marked improvement in learning achievement. The court found that the state is not meeting its own duties and responsibilities for a multicultural education established in the New Mexico Indian Education Act, Hispanic Education Act, and Bilingual Multicultural Education Act, which Representative Salazar’s pieces of legislation aim to fix.

“English language learners (ELLs) are the lowest performing group across all sub-groups when they don’t have the support they need. Also, indigenous languages are in peril. This is due in great part to current public school policies that must be addressed,” said UNM professor and bilingual learning expert Rebecca Blum Martinez. “We have an obligation to assist Indigenous and Hispanic students as much as possible while honoring the diverse cultural identity that is the hallmark of our state. These bills provide our teachers with the pedagogical tools they need to be successful.”

“These pieces of legislation, and everything else in the Transform Education platform, is what our students, and future generations of students deserve,” said Edward Tabet-Cubero, member of the Transform Education NM Coalition. “Thanks to all the information and guidance that came out of the Yazzie/Martinez trial, the court has given a clear direction for our state’s education system, and the multicultural platform is a critical component to fixing that system and doing right by our students. The time to fix our education system is now.”

Information on other legislation that is part of the Transform Education NM platform can be found here: https://transformeducationnm.org/resources/. These changes will realize New Mexico’s constitutional mandate for a sufficient public education system.

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Transform Education NM is a coalition of educational leaders, families, tribal leaders, and the lawsuit plaintiffs working to transform the state’s education system for our students. To learn more, visit www.transformeducationnm.org.

Legislation related to multicultural and multilingual education framework to be discussed TOMORROW at press event

SANTA FE—Transform Education NM, a broad coalition of teachers, parents, students, district superintendents, bilingual experts, and non-profit organizations, will hold a press event on Wednesday, February 13, at 11 a.m. in room 318 at the New Mexico State Capitol. Speakers, including Representative Tomás E. Salazar, will share details about pieces of legislation that would create a multicultural and multilingual education framework and include significant changes to ensure more bilingual teachers and professional development.

The bills must still be passed in the House Appropriations Committee and receive funding to move forward in the legislature. The committee is currently considering the public school budgets and intends to finalize its budget bill by next week.

The legislation aligns with the Transform Education NM Platform for Action, which was informed directly by the court’s landmark decision in Yazzie/Martinez.

WHAT:
Transform Education NM press event in the Roundhouse on multicultural education framework

WHO:
Representative Tomás E. Salazar
Preston Sanchez, attorney, New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty
Edward Tabet-Cubero, Learning Alliance New Mexico
Rebecca Blum Martinez, UNM professor, bilingual education expert

WHEN:
Wednesday, February 13, 11:00 a.m.

WHERE:
New Mexico State Capitol, Room 318
Santa Fe, NM 87501

And available via Facebook live here: https://www.facebook.com/TransformEdNM/

*Speakers and other coalition members will be available immediately after the press for one-on-one interviews.

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Transform Education NM is a coalition of educational leaders, families, tribal leaders, and the lawsuit plaintiffs working to transform the state’s educationsystem for our students. To learn more, visit www.transformeducationnm.org

Action Alert: Ask your elected leaders to fund a multicultural education framework

Critical decisions are being made at the legislature about the future of public schools for our children. As you know, children learn better when they have an education that is culturally and linguistically relevant to them. Several bills are advancing that would create and ensure a multicultural and multilingual education in New Mexico and the pipeline of teachers needed to support it.

We urgently need your help to call key elected leaders today to ensure these bills are funded or they might not make it past the House committee that will determine the budget. These bills are necessary for our students and would help bring the state into compliance with the Yazzie/Martinez court ruling that found the state has failed to provide a sufficient education to our children.

Please call these key elected leaders listed below TODAY and ask them to support House Bills 111, 120, 159, and 516 for a multicultural education and to ensure they are fully funded in HB 2 (General Appropriation Act).  

  1. Representative Patricia A. Lundstrom, (505) 986-4316
  2. Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham, (505) 476-2200
  3. Lt. Governor Howie Morales, (505) 476-2250
  4. Representative Roberto “Bobby” J. Gonzales, 505) 986-4319

Below are short descriptions of each bill. For more information about the Transform Education NM campaign go to: https://transformeducationnm.org/


HB 111—Cultural and Linguistic Education Support (Reps. Tomás Salazar and Linda Trujillo): Builds the capacity for Regional Education Cooperatives (RECs) to provide professional development for educators on culturally and linguistically responsive instruction. HB111 would provide funding for RECs to contract with local experts to build their capacity to provide professional development in strategies and techniques to most effectively teach culturally and linguistically diverse learners.

HB 120—Bilingual Teacher Preparation Act (Rep. Tomás Salazar): Increases the amount of bilingual and TESOL (teaching English to speakers of other languages)-endorsed teachers in New Mexico by allowing for the Higher Education Department to provide grants for students seeking degrees and/or endorsements in bilingual/multicultural education or TESOL, prioritizing current bilingual educational assistants, bilingual seal recipients, and speakers of indigenous languages.

HB 159—Multicultural Education Framework (Reps. Tomás Salazar and Christine Trujillo): Establishes a multicultural, multilingual framework for public education that aligns the duties and powers of the New Mexico Indian Education Act, Hispanic Education Act, and Bilingual Multicultural Education Act, to address the unique cultural and linguistic needs of New Mexico students.

HB 516—American Indian Educational Outcomes (Reps. Derrick Lente, Christine Trujillo, Linda Trujillo, Roberto “Bobby”Gonzales, and Patricia Lundstrom): Makes appropriations to state institutions of higher education to improve educational outcomes for American Indian public school and higher education students and families.

New analysis reveals New Mexicans suffer disproportionately under weight of student debt

Legislature considers key student loan bill as more than one in five New Mexicans are severely delinquent on their student loans 

WASHINGTON, D.C. – A new analysis of government data demonstrates the gravity of the student debt crisis in New Mexico. The analyzed data, released by the Student Borrower Protection Center (SBPC), American Federation of Teachers New Mexico (AFT-NM), and the New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty, show that more than one in five New Mexico consumers are now delinquent on their student loan debt.

New Mexico’s House is currently considering HB 172 which sets out to oversee and crack down on illegal practices by student loan companies.

“Debt stretching for decades after the completion of study is a real crisis impacting New Mexico students and is reason we need legislation like HB 172,” said Stephanie Ly, President of AFT New Mexico. “AFT New Mexico’s goal is to promote increased transparency within the student loan industry and provide mechanisms for relief should borrowers have concerns about their loans. We’ve been fortunate to have champions like Rep. Roybal Caballero carry this bill for several years now, and appreciate Rep. Hochman-Vigil’s joining this fight during her first legislative session.” 

“College should lead to opportunity, not financial ruin,” said Lindsay Cutler, attorney with the New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty. “The analysis makes a clear and compelling case that New Mexico lawmakers need to protect student loan borrowers from illegal industry practices.”

Student loan debt in New Mexico has skyrocketed over 129 percent in the last decade.

The close look at data made available by federal sources shows the student debt crisis growing for borrowers across the state, including:

  • New Mexico has the second highest student loan default rate in the country;
  • New Mexicans now owe more than $6.8 billion in student debt;
  • More than 1 out of every 5 student loan borrowers in New Mexico are severely delinquent on their debt;
  • New Mexico ranks eighth in the country of states with the highest percentage of delinquent debt, and eleventh in percent of borrowers with delinquent debt; and
  • Nearly a quarter of all borrowers living in rural New Mexico are severely delinquent.

“As student loan borrowers in New Mexico suffer each day from the burden of their debt, state leaders must take action,” said Seth Frotman, Executive Director for the Student Borrower Protection Center. “The federal government has walked away from this crisis, casting millions of New Mexicans aside in the process. The borrowers across New Mexico cannot wait any longer for predatory student loan companies to be held accountable.”

As part of HB 172, sponsored by Rep. Roybal Caballero and Rep. Hochman-Vigil, student loan servicers would be required to be licensed and subject to oversight by the New Mexico Financial Institutions Division. These proposals would help ensure that student loan servicers do not mislead borrowers, misapply payments, or provide credit reporting agencies with inaccurate information.

HB 172 is particularly important because the federal government continues to ignore mounting evidence of the nation’s growing student debt crisis. Not only has the federal government halted efforts to protect student loan borrowers, it is turning a blind eye to predatory practices and enabling bad actors to harm borrowers.

SBPC HELPING STATES FIGHT FOR 44 MILLION AMERICANS WITH STUDENT DEBT

In the face of continuing systemic abuses across the student loan industry, state governments are taking action to expand protections for student loan borrowers and halt illegal practices by predatory companies. Last year, the Student Borrower Protection Center launched States for Student Borrower Protection, an initiative that highlights the student debt crisis in states across the country, and is designed to support the leaders in and out of government working to end this crisis through state level actions. Today’s release offers further evidence that state action is urgently needed.

The analysis is part of an ongoing series of original research, projects, and campaigns by SBPC designed to help student loan borrowers by shedding light on the crisis and empower advocates.

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About the Student Borrower Protection Center (SBPC): The Student Borrower Protection Center (www.protectborrowers.org) is a nonprofit organization solely focused on alleviating the burden of student debt for millions of Americans. SBPC engages in advocacy, policymaking, and litigation strategy to rein in industry abuses, protect borrowers’ rights, and advance economic opportunity for the next generation of students. Led by the team of former federal regulators that directed oversight of the student loan market at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, SBPC exposes harmful and illegal practices in the student loan industry, drives impact litigation, advocates on behalf of student loan borrowers in Washington and in state capitals, and promotes progressive policy change. SBPC accomplishes these goals by partnering with leaders at all levels of government and throughout the nonprofit sector.

About the American Federation of Teachers – New Mexico (AFT-NM): The American Federation of Teachers is a union of professionals that champions fairness; democracy; economic opportunity; and high-quality public education, healthcare and public services for our students, their families and our communities. We are committed to advancing these principles through community engagement, organizing, collective bargaining and political activism, and especially through the work our members do.

About New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty (NMCLP): The New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty is dedicated to advancing economic and social justice through education, advocacy, and litigation. We work with low-income New Mexicans to improve living conditions, increase opportunities, and protect the rights of people living in poverty.