Action Alert: Tell the Governor that NM workers need paid sick leave!

Please call the Governor by Friday and urge her to support paid sick leave!

About half of all workers in New Mexico lack paid sick leave. They have to either go to work sick or lose wages or risk losing their jobs to care for themselves or a loved one. 

HB 20 is being heard today in its final House committee before it moves to the House floor. 

The Governor has stated that paid sick leave might be premature this year. We know New Mexicans need paid sick leave now, especially during a pandemic!

You could share a personal story about why you and other workers need paid time off when you are sick. You could also say or write something like this: “I urge Governor Lujan Grishamto support HB20 for paid sick leave. No one should have to choose between their health and their paycheck, but for the roughly half of all New Mexico workers who lack paid sick leave, this is the reality.”

You can leave her a message via this form: https://secure.everyaction.com/LRhT0gD3g0q0_9f90xoM2Q2

After you fill it out, her office will immediately call you back and ask you to leave a message. It is an automated call and not a live person on the phone.

Action Alert: Support legislation to strengthen housing stability in NM!

All New Mexicans need access to housing

On Monday at 1:30 p.m., the Legislature’s House Judiciary Committee will consider House Bill 111, which would modernize our housing laws to strengthen housing stability, reduce barriers to housing, and establish a statewide entity for housing policy.

We need your help to provide public comment at the hearing in support of this bill!

New Mexico was already in a housing crisis before the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. Unless we take action now, there will be a tidal wave of evictions as soon as the public health emergency ends, threatening our health and economic recovery as a state.

New Mexico has some of the shortest eviction time frames in the U.S.—often too short to access rental assistance, resulting in tenants being evicted and landlords losing income even when rental relief is available. Other tenants face discrimination or even eviction when landlords reject rental assistance or other lawful sources of income used to pay rent.

HB 111 would stop this discrimination and expand the eviction timeframes to allow tenants to get caught up on their rent and stay in their homes.

Instructions:

When: 1:30 p.m., Monday, February 15

How to join: Please click the link below to join the webinar: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89543370073 Or iPhone one-tap : US: +16699009128,,89543370073# or +12532158782,,89543370073# Or Telephone: Dial(for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location): US: +1 669 900 9128 or +1 253 215 8782 or +1 346 248 7799 or +1 646 558 8656 or +1 301 715 8592 or +1 312 626 6799 Webinar ID: 895 4337 0073

What to expect during the hearing: The committee will be taking public comment. The chair of the committee (Gail Chasey) will announce the bill and ask who supports HB 111. At that time, to provide a comment use the Zoom reaction button and raise your hand. The Chair will call your name and unmute your zoom when it is your turn to speak.

HB 111 summary: http://nmpovertylaw.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/Factsheet-2.pdf
House Bill 111 modernizes the New Mexico housing code by: 1) improving the balance between the rights of landlords and the rights of tenants, so families who can pay rent and comply with their lease are not evicted, 2) reducing barriers to housing for New Mexicans using housing vouchers and other lawful sources of income such as social security income to pay rent, and 3) creating a statewide housing council to address housing policy and coordinate state resources directed to addressing housing in New Mexico.

Tips for public comment:

  • Keep your remarks brief and to the point. 
  • If you have a personal story about being unable to access housing because you pay rent with a voucher or other source of income that doesn’t come from a job, or you have a personal story about being evicted because you were temporarily behind on rent, please share it.
  • When you login to Zoom, please rename yourself with your full name so the moderator can find you easily.
  • Make sure you are not muted when you start speaking.
  • Do not rely on your computer or phone for notes. Write them down or print them, just in case your computer screen freezes.
  • Close other tabs and windows in your browser to make sure your connection is good.
  • If your connection or microphone doesn’t work, be prepared to call in with the information above.

Action Alert: NM workers need paid sick leave!

Please call or email members of the committee TODAY and urge them to support paid sick leave!

About half of all workers in New Mexico lack paid sick leave. They have to either go to work sick or lose wages or risk losing their jobs to care for themselves or a loved one. 

HB37 would ensure that employees accrue one hour of paid sick leave for every 30 hours worked. 

HB37 is scheduled to be heard tomorrow in the House Labor, Veterans’ and Military Affairs Committee. 

You could share a personal story about why you and other workers need paid time off when you are sick. You could also say or write something like this: “I urge the Representative to support HB37 for paid sick leave. No one should have to choose between their health and their paycheck, but for the roughly half of all New Mexico workers who lack paid sick leave, this is the reality.”

You may also comment during the online hearing TOMORROW. Go to this Zoom link (passcode: 630659) and type your comments in via the “chat” function at the bottom of the screen. The hearing is scheduled to begin at 2 pm.

Representatives’ contact information

  • Representative Eliseo Lee Alcon (Chair): (505) 986-4416; eliseo.alcon@nmlegis.gov
  • Representative Patricia Roybal Caballero (Vice Chair): (505) 986-4248; pat.roybalcaballero@nmlegis.gov
  • Representative Karen C. Bash: (505) 986-4210; karen.bash@nmlegis.gov
  • Representative Rachel A. Black: (505) 986-4467; rachel.black@nmlegis.gov
  • Representative Miguel P. Garcia: (505) 986-4844; miguel.garcia@nmlegis.gov
  • Representative Joshua Hernandez: joshua.hernandez@nmlegis.gov
  • Representative Angelica Rubio: (505) 986-4227; angelica.rubio@nmlegis.gov
  • Representative Sheryl Williams Stapleton: (505) 986-4780; sheryl.stapleton@nmlegis.gov
  • Representative Luis M. Terrazas: luis.terrazas@nmlegis.gov

Action Alert: Support expanding access to Child Care Assistance!

One of the best ways to help hard-working parents keep their jobs and stay in school is by providing help with the exorbitant costs of child care. The Early Childhood Education and Care Department (ECECD) has proposed rules that would make New Mexico’s Child Care Assistance Program accessible to more families.

You can help make these changes by submitting comments to ECECD supporting the changes.

The proposed rules would end ineffective and burdensome requirements that force single parents to assign child support enforcement rights to the state to qualify for child care assistance. The process is so burdensome and fruitless that most parents choose to simply forgo much needed childcare along with employment and work opportunities. Complying with child support enforcement rights can also be dangerous when the absent parent was abusive or antagonizes the custodial parent.

The regulations also make child care more accessible and affordable by:

  • Making it easier to qualify by not counting certain income;
  • Eliminating the requirement of applying in-person at a child care office;
  • Granting three months of benefits to families who are searching for work (Currently, families have to be employed or in school to qualify);
  • Extending eligibility to families pursuing education in graduate school.

Tell the ECECD that you support these positive changes to the Child Care Assistance program.

1) Speak out at the public hearing. Give public comment on Wednesday, January 6, 2021 at 1:00 p.m. The hearing will take place via internet and telephone due to the COVID-19 public health emergency. To access the hearing by telephone call: 1-346-248-7799 and enter access code 9743902 4249. To access the hearing via the internet go to https://zoom.us/j/97439024249 and enter meeting code 974 3902 4249#.

2) Submit written public comments. Submit written public comments no later than January 6, 2021 at 1:00 p.m. by email to ECECD-ECS-PublicComment@state.nm.us with the subject line “8.15.2 NMAC Public Comment.” You can also submit comments by first class mail to P.O. Drawer 5169, Santa Fe, NM 87502-5169, or hand delivered to the Old PERA building at 1120 Paseo de Peralta on January 6, 2021 from 1:00p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

3) What you might include in your written or oral comments:

a) Say you support the proposed regulations.

  • I support the proposed rules, because they will expand access to child care assistance and increase affordability of the program.

b) Explain why child care assistance is important to you or your community.

  • Working families need access to affordable childcare they can trust to ensure their children have a safe space to learn while the parents are working to further their education or participate in the workforce.
  • Every working parent should be able to access quality child care without worrying about sacrificing basic needs like food and rent.
  • We know that the earliest years in children’s lives are the most important in their development and lay the foundation for all that is to come. That is why it’s so important that all working families be able to access affordable childcare that they can trust.

c) Explain how the proposed regulations will impact you or your community.

  • Child support requirements are burdensome to administer, have few benefits for families and put domestic violence survivors in danger. Other states have eliminated these requirements.
  • Child care is unaffordable for low income families, because the program has high copays. The federal government recommends that families pay no more than 7% of their income on child care so that is affordable. New Mexico should eliminate co-pays for families below 100% of the federal poverty level and make them affordable for other families.
  • It will be easier to find a job if childcare is available when families are looking for work.
  • Eliminating the requirement to submit applications in-person will lower burdens on applicants and increases child care accessibility.

You can find the full text of the proposed rules here: http://164.64.110.134/nmac/nmregister/xxxi/ECECDnotice_xxxi22.html

URGENT ACTION ALERT: Ask the governor to create rent relief fund to prevent homelessness!

To prevent a dramatic rise in homelessness as New Mexico navigates the COVID-19 crisis and its economic aftermath, Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham must prioritize housing relief, including legislation creating a rent relief fund and protections for renters in the upcoming special session this week. Legislative leaders have worked diligently on a crucial housing protection and rent relief package for New Mexico, but the Legislature cannot hear it unless the governor puts the legislation on her agenda.  

New Mexico received hundreds of millions of dollars in federal funds to support New Mexicans impacted by the COVID-19 crisis. These funds should be used to prevent a housing crisis in New Mexico.

Call the governor at (505) 476-2200 before Wednesday, June 17 and ask her to create a rent relief fund and put housing protections on the agenda for the special session! You will only be able to leave a short, simple message on the phone with one or two points, but you can also email the Governor at this link with more extensive comments.

Information to consider including in your message to the governor about this important issue:

  • All New Mexicans deserve access to safe and stable housing, and especially during a pandemic. 
  • Right now, thousands of families in our state can’t pay rent because of the pandemic-related economic downturn. 
  • New Mexico was already struggling with a housing crisis before the COVID-19 pandemic, and our communities cannot afford for this problem to get any worse. 
  • As current eviction protections and unemployment begin to end this summer, we need the state, through the Governor and the Legislature, to act to mitigate the financial devastation for families and prevent a dramatic rise in homelessness. 
  • If the state does not act in the special session, many New Mexican families will become homeless in the coming months. 
  • A sharp increase in homelessness will be devastating not only for families across our state, but entire communities, and our state and local economies for years to come. 
  • Please utilize federal CARES Act dollars to create a statewide rent relief fund. 
  • Please support meaningful legislation in the Special Session to repeal the antiquated statewide rent control ban and give the Governor the power to institute a statewide emergency eviction moratorium.  

ACTION ALERT: Tell the Trump administration not to cut SNAP

We have a shared commitment in our country that no one should ever go hungry, but a new rule proposed by the Trump administration would cause approximately 12,261 New Mexicans to lose food assistance. The rule is so draconian, it  would drop thousands of children from  free and reduced school lunch across the state. 

We need your help to let the Trump administration know that you oppose this attack on New Mexico’s families! Submit your public comment by Monday, September 23.

The rule cuts food assistance by eliminating state ability to increase the gross income test for SNAP. Currently, states have the flexibility to set this test between 130% and 200% of the federal poverty level. New Mexico currently sets the gross income limit at 165% of the federal poverty level. 

In New Mexico over 6,639 single parents, including 2,961 single parents in school and 5,607 children are among those who would lose food benefits. Children who receive SNAP food assistance are categorically eligible for free and reduced lunch and are automatically enrolled. Children cut off of SNAP would lose this enrollment option.. 

Cuts to federal food assistance also hurt our local economy. Over $30 million in economic activity will be lost if New Mexicans lose federal food benefits under this rule. 

The proposal would also end streamlined enrollment options that reduce paperwork for families who are already receiving services funded by New Mexico’s Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Program. Under the proposal, these families would no longer be exempt from the burdensome requirement to document assets.. 

New Mexicans have fought back against similar policies proposed by the Martinez administration, and made it clear that we should fight hunger not hungry people. 

Deadline to submit your public comments: September 23, 2019. 

Submit your comments here: https://www.regulations.gov/document?D=FNS-2018-0037-0001 

What to include in your comment: 

Use the outline below to draft a comment that reflects your opposition to the rule. It does not have to be long or detailed. However, please write some original text to maximize the impact. 

1. Say you oppose the proposal: 

  • I strongly oppose the proposed rule that will take food assistance away from families. 

2. Explain the impact of the proposal on your community: 

  • If the Trump Administration implements the rule, approximately 12,261 New Mexicans will lose food assistance that includes 5,607 children. 
  • One in five New Mexicans participate in the SNAP program. 
  • New Mexico has the highest rate of food insecurity in the nation. According to 2019 USDA Economic Research Service data, 16.8% of New Mexico’s households are food insecure. 
  • The rule jeopardizes access to free and reduced lunch, because kids who are eligible for SNAP are also eligible for automatic enrollment free and reduced school lunch. 
  • The rule will cause a loss of approximately $30 million in economic activity, and SNAP dollars are spent in the local economy. 

3. Explain why the policy is wrong: 

  • The proposal runs contrary to the purpose of SNAP, which is to “safeguard the health and well-being of the Nation’s population by raising levels of nutrition among low-income households.” 
  • Losing SNAP can mean an increase in healthcare costs. A study published by the American Medical Association found that on average SNAP participation lowers an individual’s health care expenditures by approximately $1,447.00 per year. 
  • Families who work for low wages, or who cannot find enough work hours, will be expected to go hungry.

Action Alert: Stop the Trump administration from undermining healthcare rights law

The Trump administration is attempting to undermine enforcement of nondiscrimination protections under the Affordable Care Act. These efforts will especially harm trans people, the LGBTQ+ community, patients who speak languages other than English, and people who need access to abortion services.

The ACA’s landmark nondiscrimination provision, known as Section 1557 or the Health Care Rights Law, protects patients from discrimination based on of race, color, national origin, sex, age, and disability. 

We encourage individuals and groups to submit comments with the Federal Register opposing the rollback of these important legal protections. Comments are due August 13.

The Trump administration is proposing rules that would reinterpret Section 1557 by:

  • exempting a broad number of healthcare programs and entities from having to comply with Section 1557’s nondiscrimination provisions;
  • eliminating nondiscrimination protections for LGBTQ+ persons from regulations;
  • ending provisions that ensure people who speak languages other than English receive critical notices in the language they speak; 
  • removing protections against health plan designs that discriminate against people with serious or chronic health conditions. 

Discrimination has no place in healthcare. Rolling back section 1557 would allow discrimination and stereotyping to override patient care. This will endanger the health and lives of many New Mexicans and create needless confusion for providers and patients alike. 

To ensure your comment is accepted, please make sure your comment has at least one-third original text. You can submit your comment here:http://eqnm.org/save1557

*Your comment will submitted via Equality NM. EQNM, the New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty, and Southwest Women’s Law Center will have access to your comment and contact information.

Sample content for your public comment

  • Section 1557 of the Affordable Care Act prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, and disability. This proposed rule attempts to change the administrative implementation of Section 1557 in a way that is contrary to the plain language of the law.
  • New Mexico has some of the highest rates of residents who identify as transgender in the country. In many parts of the state there are areas where only one hospital or health provider could result in less access to healthcare for transgender people. This would result in some traveling far distances to receive critical care, while others may simply not receive any medical care. It is important that nondiscrimination protections are in place for healthcare providers to ensure that patients can access the same care provided to all, no matter who they are. These protections are fundamental for LGBTQ+ patients to be able to access the care they need. 
  • In New Mexico, 29% of respondents experienced a problem last year with their insurance related to being transgender, such as being denied coverage for care related to gender transition or being denied coverage for routine care because they were transgender.
  • Sex discrimination in health care has a disproportionate impact on women of color, LGBTQ+ people and individuals living at the intersections of multiple identities—resulting in them paying more for healthcare, receiving improper diagnoses at higher rates, being provided less effective treatments and sometimes being denied care altogether. The inability to access needed healthcare services could further exacerbate health disparities.
  • Discrimination has no place in healthcare. The delivery of healthcare services in the United States should be premised upon the medical needs of the people, and should not be obstructed by the personal beliefs or ideologies of their healthcare providers.
  • Discrimination on the basis of national origin, which encompasses discrimination on the basis of language, creates unequal access to healthcare. Without meaningful access, millions of individuals will be excluded from programs and services they are legally entitled to, including hundreds of thousands here in New Mexico.

Child care assistance hearing postponed

We did it! Thanks to all your hard work, the Children, Youth and Families Department announced yesterday that it will not cut child care assistance eligibility to 160% of the Federal Poverty Level as it proposed. It will maintain the current eligibility of 200% FPL for child care assistance contracts.

The hearing scheduled for Monday, July 8 has been postponed until further notice.

While this is great news, CYFD still requires families to pay unaffordable copays. Too many parents are forced to drop out of the child care assistance program and find cheaper⁠ and often less safe⁠ alternatives or reduce their work hours or drop out of school.

CYFD will reschedule the hearing and will continue to take public comment on this issue. Let’s keep the momentum going!

We ALL depend on child care to work or pursue an education. Thank you for submitting comments, making phone calls, and for standing with New Mexico’s parents and children!

You can read about CYFD’s announcement here.

Stop Trump’s attack on immigrant families!

The Trump administration is proposing a new rule that would force immigrant families to decide between living together and separating to avoid eviction from housing. 

In May, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development proposed a new rule that would prevent “mixed status” families from living in public housing together or receiving Section 8 housing vouchers. Mixed status families consist of family members who are both eligible and ineligible to receive public housing assistance based on their immigration status.

Under current rules, ineligible family members can live in the same household with their family, but the amount of HUD assistance is based upon the number of eligible family members. None of the public housing assistance pays for an ineligible family member’s share of rent.

The Trump administration’s proposed rule is a blanket attack on all immigrant families who need housing assistance. A person can have lawful immigration status, but still not be eligible for housing assistance. Examples of immigrants with legal status who do not qualify for public housing assistance include immigrants with student or work visas as well as survivors of serious crimes who are granted U-visas.

Please tell the Trump administration to abandon this harsh and unfair rule!

HUD’s own analysis states that over 55,000 children who are U.S. citizens or green card holders could be evicted from their family homes under the proposed policy. 

It would also force tens of thousands of housing providers to collect documents from residents “proving” their citizenship. This requirement will impact over nine million U.S. citizens and 120,000 elderly immigrants. Many of these tenants, especially the elderly and those who have disabilities, face serious obstacles accessing required documentation.

Tell the Trump administration to keep families together in New Mexico and the nation by submitting your public comment by July 9, 2019!

Below is some content to include in your comment. To maximize its impact, make sure your comment has at least one third original text. You can submit your comment here: https://www.regulations.gov/docket?D=HUD-2019-0044

Sample content for your public comment:

  • Families will face the decision of either breaking up in order to receive housing assistance or forgoing assistance and facing homelessness in order to stay to together.
  • Mixed status families will be evicted within 18 months of the implementation of the new rule or sooner.
  • HUD’s statistics show that the proposed rule will evict as many as 25,000 immigrant families including 55,000 children who are eligible for housing assistance.
  • Over 9 million United States citizens and 120,000 elderly immigrants must provide further documentation of eligibility in order to continue receiving housing assistance. Many of these individuals will face serious obstacles accessing the required documentation.
  • The proposed rule will actually cost more to provide housing assistance to fewer people. Millions of families struggle to find affordable housing; however, blaming immigrants will not solve this problem. Since existing law requires that subsides are prorated to only assist eligible immigrants or citizens in a household, the new rule will merely shift housing assistance benefits to other eligible individuals. HUDs own analysis admits that the policy will cost approximately $200 million dollars and will result in reduced quality and quantity of assisted housing.
  • The policy will result in significant administrative costs and burdens. It will require housing providers to verify documentation that was not previously required from millions of residents. Additionally, it will force housing authorities to develop new policies to determine which families can continue to receive housing assistance.

ACTION ALERT: Tell CYFD not to cut child care assistance!

All families need access to affordable child care so they can make a living and pursue future career opportunities. But in a move that will prevent parents who are working or in school from getting much needed child care, the Children, Youth and Families Department proposed this week to cut eligibility to New Mexico’s Child Care Assistance Program and to continue to require families to pay an unaffordable share of costs. Without access to affordable child care, families will be forced to either go without child care or forego education or employment opportunities.

The regulation will hurt hard working New Mexico families by:

  • Cutting eligibility to 160% FPL from 200%. This means less families will have access to child care assistance, even though they are low income.  
  • Requiring low-income families to pay an unaffordable share of costs. Federal guidance found that child care costs over 7% are not affordable for working families. CYFD’s proposal requires families to pay more than 10% of their income towards child care and higher, depending on the size of a family.

Please tell CYFD to make child care accessible and affordable for New Mexican families!

Speak out at the public hearing:
Monday, July 8, 2019 at 11:00 a.m.
Apodaca Hall, 1120 Paseo De Peralta, Santa Fe, NM 87502.

Submit written public comment no later than July 8, 2019 at 11:00 a.m.

  • By email to: CYFD-ECS-PublicComment@state.nm.us with the subject line “8.15.2 NMAC Public Comment” or
  • By mail to: Kimberly Brown, Child Care Services Bureau, CYFD, P.O. Drawer 5160, Santa Fe, NM 87502-5160.  

Sample content for public comment on cuts to child care assistance. 

Slashing eligibility for child care assistance harms New Mexico’s families!
Families need reliable and safe child care so that they can make a living and pursue future career opportunities. Without child care assistance, families are often unable to afford appropriate child care and are faced with the difficult choice of either resorting to lower quality care or foregoing education or work opportunities. CYFD raised eligibility to 200% of the federal poverty level in November of 2018 and enrollment has not increased. CYFD should seek supplemental funding from the legislature before cutting the eligibility level.

CYFD’s copayments are unaffordable!
According to CYFD data, just a third of eligible families participate in the program. Federal law requires CYFD to make co-payments affordable for families. Federal guidance recommends that co-payments be no higher than 7% of a family’s income. CYFD has not set a cap on copayments, and parents often pay much more than 10% of their income on child care, including families living in deep poverty. CYFD data from FY2017, shows a 66% drop in participation in the program once families are charged a copay, beginning with incomes as low as 25% to 50% of the FPL. Parents who cannot afford the copayment often have to reduce their work hours or seek alternative and often unreliable care. Families should not have to choose between paying for childcare or other basic necessities like food and clothing. New Mexico’s kids deserve better!