Sick Leave Ordinance Introduced at the Bernalillo County Commission

Low-wage workers, community leaders applaud first great step to building a stronger economy by ensuring our workers are healthy

Albuquerque, N.M.– During a packed meeting Tuesday night, the Bernalillo County Commission introduced a proposed paid sick leave ordinance for Bernalillo County —a step supporters of the ordinance say will support families succeed in building thriving communities.

Bernalillo County Commissioner Maggie Hart-Stebbins introduced the Bernalillo County Paid Sick Leave Ordinance as a way to alleviate the challenges working families face when forced to choose between losing a day’s pay or going to work sick because of the need to care for themselves or for their loved ones.

The proposed ordinance does the following:

  • The ordinance applies to any worker employed at least 56 hours per year at a business with two or more employees, the county, or a nonprofit with two or more employees in Bernalillo County.
  • It allows workers to accrue one hour of paid sick time for every 30 hours worked.
    • Employers are not required to provide more than a total of 56 hours per year.
    • Paid sick leave can be used starting on the 90th calendar day after they are hired.
    • Allows up to 56 hours of unused sick time carry over into the next year
  • Allows employers who currently have a PTO policy that exceeds the minimal requirements of this ordinance to continue with their current policy.

The following conditions exempt a business from providing paid sick leave:

  • Businesses or employers with only one employee
  • New business startups that obtain an exemption for their first year of business
  • And family-owned and operated businesses that employ only family members

“The introduction of a possible paid sick leave program in Bernalillo County makes sense because a strong economy begins with every worker in our community having the ability to care for their health and well being,” said Maggie Hart-Stebbins, Bernalillo County Commissioner. “Everyone gets sick and everyone should be able to take time to care for themselves or their families. Providing earned sick days protects the economic stability of working families and the public health across our community.”

According to a study by the University of New Mexico Bureau of Business and Economic Research, in the city of Albuquerque alone, 36% of private-sector workers have no paid sick leave and that 90% of those with household incomes less than $15,000 presently do not have paid sick leave.

The following are reactions from low-wage workers and community organizations from across bernalillo County who are in support of the ‘Paid Sick Leave’ ordinance:

“Family stability comes in a variety of ways: good public education, good paying jobs, and a support system to get us through unpredictable life moments, said Trae Buffin, member of OLÉ. “Paid Sick Leave is about putting our New Mexican families’ needs first and providing them the support they need to build thriving communities.”

“Unfortunately not every family or worker has a strong support system to go through sickness, family emergencies, or even protecting their own lives and those of their children,” said Mary Ann Maestas, Member, NM Working Families Party. “Today’s introduced proposal will alleviate this challenge by allowing workers to accrue paid time that can be used to care for those “life moments” while not losing a day pay or even their jobs.”

“Families shouldn’t have to worry about shattering their family budget and getting buried under healthcare costs because they can’t afford to lose a day’s pay,” said Hilda Gomez, low-wage worker and member of El CENTRO de Igualdad y Derechos. “Having paid sick leave ensures we take care of the most integral part of our state economy: OUR WORKERS! Because when our workers are ok, our economy is ok, and we increase our opportunity to make our state thrive.”

The proposed ‘paid sick leave’ ordinance is expected to be voted on June 25, 2019.