Senate farm bill protects New Mexico families’ access to SNAP  

ALBUQUERQUE— On Thursday, the U.S. Senate passed its farm bill, which protects and strengthens the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), by an overwhelmingly bipartisan vote of 86-11. The Senate’s bill is in stark contrast to the partisan House farm bill narrowly passed last week, which if passed, would restrict food assistance to millions of Americans and hundreds of thousands New Mexicans through cuts and harmful changes to SNAP.

The House and Senate will now need to negotiate a final farm bill before sending it to the White House for President Trump’s signature.

“The Senate farm bill strengthens SNAP and protects millions of Americans’ access to healthy food. This is great news for New Mexico where SNAP is of particular importance. Over 450,000 New Mexicans rely on SNAP to put food on the table, including 40 percent of the state’s young children,” said Maria Griego, supervising attorney at the New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty. “Congress should use the Senate farm bill as a basis for its final legislation. We urge our elected leaders to negotiate a final, bi-partisan bill that remains faithful to the Senate’s approach. We need a farm bill that grows income and employment opportunities for all Americans and bolsters, not weakens our country’s most effective anti-hunger program.”

The Senate bill would provide for modest improvements to SNAP’s operations and administration. It also would expand the 2014 farm bill’s pilot program to test new approaches to job training and other employment-related activities for SNAP participants.

Should a farm bill that is closer to the House’s version pass, up to 121,000 New Mexicans would face termination of SNAP, while tens of thousands of children and other family members would face reduced benefits for up to three years.

For more information on the House version of the 2018 farm bill and how the SNAP cuts would impact New Mexico, go to:  http://nmpovertylaw.org/2018/04/proposed-cuts-to-snap-in-house-farm-bill-would-take-food-off-the-table-for-new-mexico-families/

For more information on SNAP in New Mexico, go to: http://nmpovertylaw.org/proposed-budget-will-increase-hunger-and-inequality-in-nm-february-2018/

Hearing on proposed small loan regulations Monday

CHAMA—The New Mexico Legislative Indian Affairs Committee will hold an interim legislative hearing in Chama on Monday regarding the Financial Institutions Division’s proposed regulations on HB 347, which imposes a 175 percent APR interest rate cap on small loans. The New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty and Prosperity Works will ask the committee to pass a resolution requesting the FID provide information about how it is enforcing this new law and present that report to the committee later this fall.

Before passage of HB 347 in the 2017 legislative session, most small loans were unregulated and interest rates were even higher. HB 347 ensures that borrowers have the right to clear information about total loan costs, allows borrowers to develop a credit history when they make payments on small-dollar loans, and sets minimum contract terms for small loans including at least four payments and 120 days to pay off most loans. Refund anticipation loans are exempt from those requirements.

While the law and proposed regulations signal progress for fair loan terms, much more work remains to be done to ensure fair access to credit for all New Mexicans. Storefront lenders with predatory business practices that trap people in a cycle of unaffordable debt have deep roots in the state and have aggressively targeted generations of low-income families and Native communities, pushing loans with high-interest rates or arbitrary fees with no regard for an individual’s ability to repay.

The FID’s proposed regulations can be found here: www.rld.state.nm.us/financialinstitutions/

The Center’s comments on the proposed regulations can be found here: https://wp.me/a7pqlk-10H

The Center’s suggested changes to the proposed regulations can be found here: https://wp.me/a7pqlk-10I

WHAT: 
Indian Affairs Committee interim legislative hearing on proposed HB 347 regulations, which impose a 175 percent interest rate cap on small loans.

WHEN:
Monday, July 2, 2018 at 12:30 p.m.

WHERE:     
Lodge and Ranch at Chama
16253 S Chama Highway 84, Chama, NM 87520
Chama, NM 87520

WHO:
Indian Affairs Committee
New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty
Prosperity Works
FID
Member of the public

Action Alert: Public charge-the latest threat to immigrant families 

The Trump administration is expected to issue a proposed federal regulation soon that forces families that include immigrants to choose between meeting basic needs and keeping their families together. The revised “public charge” rule could block immigrants from becoming legal permanent residents (LPRs) or “green card” holders if they or their dependents–including U.S. citizen children–use public benefits for which they are eligible.

What is the public charge test now?

The “public charge” test identifies immigrants who might depend on government benefits like Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, Supplemental Security Income, and General Assistance. If the government determines someone is likely to become a “public charge,” it can deny admission to the U.S. or refuse an application for lawful permanent residency.

The Trump administration wants to drastically expand the list of programs included in public charge determination, threatening access to food, medical, and housing assistance for millions of lawfully present immigrant families and their U.S. citizen children.

This change would cause families to forgo critical assistance like Medicaid and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) for fear of family members being deported or denied a green card, putting them at greater risk of falling into poverty. It would also allow the administration to significantly shift the U.S. legal immigration system away from family-based immigration–all without the approval of Congress.

Sign up here to help us resist! Help fight this shameful rule!

You can find information on what we know about the proposed changes here.
You can information about public charge and the proposed changes in Spanish here.

McKinley County Commission unanimously supports innovative ‘Medicaid buy-in’

Community need and widespread support inspired commission

GALLUP–The McKinley County Commission, after hearing powerful community testimony, on Tuesday unanimously passed a resolution in support of the state’s work to develop and implement an innovative plan to allow New Mexicans the opportunity to buy-in to the proven, trusted Medicaid healthcare system.

“With more than 16,000 McKinley residents still uninsured,” said Christopher Hudson from the McKinley Communities Health Alliance “We need to support innovative ideas that will help everyone in our communities get the health care they need. A Medicaid buy-in program is a great option to make quality care affordable and accessible.”

In the 2018 Legislative Session, both the House and the Senate passed memorials calling for the Legislative Health and Human Services Committee to explore the policy and fiscal implications of offering a Medicaid Buy-in plan to New Mexico residents.

By allowing McKinley County residents to buy-in to Medicaid for their health coverage, a state program would reduce uncompensated care for doctors and hospitals and would also save much-needed funding in the county’s indigent care funds.

“I know how hard it can be to access health care,” said McKinley County resident and Strong Families New Mexico healthcare advocate Althea Yazzie. “I’ve had to fight with insurance providers to get help to pay for my medications, my transportation, and my rheumatologist appointments. Being sick is hard. Getting better shouldn’t be. I’m proud of our county for supporting Medicaid buy-in.”

In addition to sharing the resolution with legislators to show the county’s support for a Medicaid buy-in plan, the resolution also adds Medicaid buy-in to McKinley County’s legislative priorities, meaning the county will work directly with legislators to advance the program.

New Mexico families in danger of losing access to SNAP   

House Farm Bill passes

ALBUQUERQUE— The 2018 House Farm Bill, passed by the U.S. House of Representatives today, significantly cuts the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)—formerly known as food stamps—by more than $20 billion over the next ten years by shrinking eligibility for families, penalizing unemployed older adults, and other changes.

If passed by the U.S. Senate, the cuts will make it difficult for millions of Americans to access enough groceries and healthy food, and would be especially damaging to New Mexico, where over 450,000 people rely on SNAP to eat, including 40 percent of the state’s young children.

The following can be attributed to Sovereign Hager, Managing Attorney at the New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty:

“SNAP, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, is our country’s most successful hunger fighting program. It helps hundreds of thousands of struggling New Mexicans put food on the table and is of particular importance in the southern half of our state where almost one in four people participate in the program. But the new House Farm Bill cuts SNAP, and Congressman Steve Pearce, who represents District 2, voted again to increase food insecurity and hardship across New Mexico.

“Earlier this year, Congress passed a bill that gives $84 billion in tax breaks to the wealthiest one percent – enough money to fund the entire SNAP program which costs less than $60 million. Few in District 2 or in New Mexico will benefit from those tax cuts for the wealthiest, but at least 162,393 New Mexicans in Congressman Pearce’s district participate in SNAP. Should this legislation pass in the Senate, up to 121,000 New Mexicans would face termination of SNAP, while tens of thousands of children and other family members would face reduced benefits for up to three years.

“Some of these families will lose food assistance due to illogical new work requirements. Research shows that SNAP gives people the support they need to get back on their feet and that compared to people not receiving SNAP, unemployed SNAP participants are more likely, not less, to find work. Despite this clear data showing that it is completely backward to take food away from people who are struggling to find work, the House Farm Bill would force New Mexico to develop a large bureaucracy to track employment and unpaid work hours of people on SNAP and cut unemployed adults, including those with children over six years old.

“Our state elected leaders should know just how misguided such policies are. In 2014 and 2015, Governor Martinez experimented with the same expensive bureaucracy and harsh penalties here in New Mexico despite widespread opposition. The courts ordered the state to stop the program because the state couldn’t administer it without terminating food assisatnce for eligible families.

“The truth is most New Mexican families that can work, do work. Over half of the families who participate in SNAP in New Mexico are in working families. Families in our state receive SNAP for an average of just 14 months, making it a critical temporary support.

“Food is at the heart of our culture here in New Mexico, and in southern New Mexico, food and agriculture have deep roots. The congressional bill threatens not just our families but also our local economies and vibrant local food systems. Millions in SNAP benefits boost food purchases and creates jobs in food retail and agriculture. In fact, SNAP generates $1.70 of economic activity for every federal dollar spent. Over $650 million in SNAP benefits were spent at retailers in New Mexico last year.

“Instead of trying to cut SNAP, lawmakers should focus on bipartisan legislation that grows income and employment opportunities for all New Mexicans through policies that actually work. We urge Steve Pearce and other lawmakers to stop supporting such damaging legislation and instead to strengthen SNAP and ensure families across New Mexico can meet their basic needs.”

For more information on the 2018 Farm Bill and how the SNAP cuts would have impacted southern New Mexico, go to:  http://nmpovertylaw.org/2018/05/farm-bill-proposal-would-hurt-southern-new-mexico-economy-and-leave-families-hungry/

For more information on SNAP in New Mexico, go to: http://nmpovertylaw.org/proposed-budget-will-increase-hunger-and-inequality-in-nm-february-2018/