Legislative Health and Human Services Committee to Hold Hearing on Medicaid Cuts Today

ALBUQUERQUE, NM—The New Mexico Legislative Health and Human Services (LHHS) Committee will hold a hearing today, starting at 12:30 p.m., on the serious cuts the Medicaid program faces in the Human Services Department’s (HSD) Centennial Care 2.0 waiver proposal. The hearing will take place at the Science and Technology Center Rotunda at UNM, 801 University Blvd. SE in Albuquerque, NM.

The proposal eliminates certain coverage and health benefits for low-income patients and imposes new patient fees in the form of co-pays and premiums to children enrolled in the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), the working disabled, and low-income adults living just above the poverty line.

“Medicaid has worked well for New Mexico. The state should focus on ensuring our families can get the care they need to stay healthy, not cut coverage for the people who can least afford it,” said Abuko D. Estrada, an attorney with the New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty. “At a time when our economy is struggling, these cuts will drive families into further financial hardships and throw away federal funding that helps sustain thousands of jobs.”

Currently for every state dollar New Mexico invests in Medicaid, the state receives four dollars back from the federal government. The Centennial Care 2.0 waiver proposal cuts will result in the loss of federal money for Medicaid that supports over 50,000 jobs and helps drive the New Mexico economy.

Centennial Care 2.0’s most harmful cuts to Medicaid include:

  • Charging low-income patients with new fees in the form of co-pays and premiums for children in CHIP, the working disabled, and low-income adults living just above the poverty line, which could result in thousands of people losing coverage altogether (as studies have shown);
  • Eliminating retroactive coverage protection that pays for Medicaid applicants’ past medical bills, from three months prior to applying for Medicaid, putting New Mexico’s families in severe medical debt and leaving healthcare providers with uncompensated care costs;
  • Ending a transitional Medicaid program that will result in coverage loss for families that have been living in deep poverty, creating financial hardships and interrupting health coverage when they enter new jobs or accept raises that place them just above the eligibility threshold for Medicaid; and
  • Reducing important health benefits for very low-income adults with dependent children, eliminating Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic, and Treatment (EPSDT) protections for children who are 19 and 20 year olds, and opening the door for the HSD secretary to make drastic cuts to more benefits in the future.

WHAT:
LHHS Committee Hearing on the Centennial Care 2.0 Waiver Proposal

WHO/WHEN:       
12:30 p.m.
Presentations about Concerns about Medicaid Cuts
Abuko D. Estrada, Attorney, New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty
David Machledt, Ph.D., Senior Policy Analyst, National Health Law Program

2:30 p.m.
Presentation on Medicaid Waiver
HSD Secretary Brent Earnest

4:30 p.m.
Public Comment

WHERE:   
Science and Technology Center Rotunda at UNM
801 University Blvd SE
Albuquerque, NM

Today’s hearing will be the only opportunity for providing comments in Albuquerque. Other public meetings will take place in Santa Fe, Las Cruces, and Las Vegas.

 

Legislative Health and Human Services Committee to Hold Hearing Tomorrow on Medicaid Cuts

ALBUQUERQUE, NM—The Legislative Health and Human Services (LHHS) Committee will hold a hearing on Medicaid, Wednesday, September 20, about the serious cuts the program faces in the Human Services Department’s (HSD) Centennial Care 2.0 waiver proposal.

The proposal eliminates certain coverage and health benefits and imposes new excessive patient fees in the form of co-pays and premiums to children enrolled in the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), the working disabled, and low-income adults living just above the poverty line. These fees will prevent people from seeking necessary healthcare and cause thousands of others to lose coverage.

WHAT:
LHHS Committee Hearing on the Centennial Care 2.0 Waiver Proposal

WHERE:
Science and Technology Center Rotunda at UNM
801 University Blvd SE
Albuquerque, NM

WHO/WHEN:
12:30 pm: Presentation on Concerns with Centennial Care 2.0 Proposal
Abuko D. Estrada, Attorney, New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty
David Machledt, Ph.D., Senior Policy Analyst, National Health Law Program

2:30 pm: HSD presentation on Centennial Care 2.0 Proposal
HSD Secretary Brent Earnest

4:30 pm: Public Comment

 

Job Opportunity: Staff Attorney-Public Benefits

We are looking for a dynamic and creative staff attorney, who would be assigned to our Public Benefits Team to enhance our work with low income New Mexicans to address hunger and secure fundamental fairness in the administration of the public safety net.   This is a full-time permanent position.

The work at the Center on Law and Poverty is varied, always challenging and highly rewarding.  The work week is reasonable and the staff superb.  We offer a good non-profit salary and excellent benefits.

Required: Law degree and license; minimum three years of civil litigation experience; demonstrated intellectual or academic excellence; very strong research and writing skills; demonstrated persistence and capacity to lead; ability to problem-solve creatively; detail-oriented; commitment to economic and racial justice in alignment with the mission of the NM Center on Law & Poverty.  Preferred: experience with advocacy seeking systemic fairness in the administration of government benefit programs or in related institutional contexts; experience working with diverse community groups and other allies; familiarity with poverty law; Spanish fluency.

Apply in confidence by sending a resume and letter specifying which position you are interested in and detailing how you meet the position requirements to veronica@nmpovertylaw.org  We are an equal opportunity employer. People with disabilities, people of color, former recipients of public assistance, or people who have grown up in poverty, are especially encouraged to apply.